Celeriac and leek soup

celeriac-4Celeriac and leek soup with hazelnuts and crispy sage – serves 2

This warming soup is an ideal starter if you have a vegan or vegetarian guest coming for Christmas.  It can be made in advance and frozen.  Crisp the sage leaves and add the hazelnuts on the day though

In fact it is so tasty all your meat eating guests will want a bowl, but don’t worry the recipe can easily be double or tripled

vegan-xmas-poster-jpegMy vegan Christmas cookery class guests will be making it (along with chestnut and cranberry terrine and chocolate pots) on Saturday 10th December. I have a couple of places left if you’d like to join me

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

Celeriac and leek soup with hazelnuts and crispy sage – serves 2

15g hazelnuts,2 tsp olive oil

100g leek

1 garlic clove

500ml veg stock

250g celeriac, peeled and chopped

200g floury potato (russet, Desiree, King Edward and Maris Piper.) chopped only

12 small sage leaves, salt & pepper to taste

Drizzle lemon juice and extra virgin olive oil

 

  • hazelnutsAdd the hazelnuts to a hot dry frying pan. Cook for 3-4 minutes until toasted, keep shaking the pan.
  • Wrap the toasted nuts in a paper towel and rub to remove the brown skin. Cool then roughly chop
  • Heat 1 tsp oil in the pan cook the thinly sliced leek on a medium heat for 5-6 mins. Add the chopped garlic and cook for another minute. Add the celeriac, potatoes and stock

celeriac-5

  • Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 20-22 mins until the veg is soft. Using a stick blender blend until smooth and creamy. Taste and adjust seasoning

 

 

  • celeriac-6Heat 1 tsp oil in a pan and fry the sage leaves, stirring for 1 -2 mins until crispy. Drain on paper. Serve the soup topped with the toasted nuts and sage leaves. Finish with a drizzle of lemon juice and olive oil (or you could add a splash of soya cream)

Case study #1 – weight loss via a virtual consultation

Case study #1 – weight loss via a virtual consultation

 

These are the words of my client Karen, she contacted me after seeing my blog on Mumsnet.  Although she is based in Yorkshire we were able to conduct a series of virtual consultations via Skype, so I could help support her to achieve her weight loss goal

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I made notes in my journal dated 28/09/15, about my dissatisfaction with my weight, body image and relationship with food. At that point I was totally and utterly fed up with myself.

karen-white-dress-beforeI had been to the graduations of both my sons in the summer, having bought a very expensive Josef Ribkoff “ figure hugging dress for both occasions. I was dispirited when I saw the photos after, as the dress appeared to only accentuate the thickening around my middle section.

 

The main points were

  • I was worrying constantly about my weight and body shape but could not motivate myself to make changes
  • I hated the way I looked
  • I hated the way I felt out of control around food
  • I felt anxiety being “around food” all the time
  • My home felt dominated by food, food choices, preparation and cooking
  • My social life seemed to revolve around eating and drinking
  • My eating patterns had become very erratic – I wasn’t eating full meals but lots of snacks – I felt overly full very quickly if I ate a “proper” meal
  • My husband and son were at home a lot more than before (one semi-retired, one a student) so there seems to be food and cooking on the go constantly
  • I don’t want to go on a diet – I’m a Slimming World veteran
  • Female friends talk constantly about weight and diet

My Stats

  • My body details then were – height 5’9”, weight 11st 3lbs (would like to be 10st 7lbs)
  • Size 14 top, size 12 bottom – upside down pear – no hips or bottom but a largish bust, long legs
  • Tallness helps disguise “fat bits” and I’m highly skilled at dressing to hide them

On the plus side, I considered myself fairly active, swimming for 30 minutes three mornings a week. My diet includes many healthy options (I’m not a vegetarian but eat very little meat – red or white) I just ate too much of everything, too many snacks, too many coffees and teas and slightly more alcohol than I would like to, in an average week. I was generally very healthy with low blood pressure and plenty of energy.

However, I had got into a downward spiral and felt a strong need to talk to someone about all this, someone who would understand the psychology behind my problems and issues, but who would be able to help me formulate a healthier and more balanced eating plan.

Purely by chance, I found Susan whilst looking on Mumsnet Bloggers. Ideally I would have liked to have spoken to someone face to face but Susan appeared to have the skills and background to meet my needs. I confess, not being a wage earner, I was also drawn in by the offer of 3 sessions for £100!

Once I had hooked up with Susan, I wasn’t anxious in the least, although I had to put off our initial session due to holidays. I had used my “private” email address as I didn’t want my husband to see I was seeking help and using family money – I regarded the issues as a form of “weakness” and felt guilty about them – as though it was a problem an intelligent person should be able to solve on their own!

I felt embarrassed at home at having to secure some privacy to use my husband’s PC to use Skype, but made up my mind to tell him about the “project” and he was very understanding. I didn’t feel it mattered at all that Susan and I didn’t meet face to face – I found Skype absolutely fine.

I found Susan very understanding from the word “go”. She was “on my side”!!   I had not looked for anyone else similar as I sensed she was a lady of possibly a similar age group to me and therefore might have a better understanding of the issues facing a “middle-aged” lady!!

Karen before and after 

I felt we connected very well. I think I really needed some psychological support around my issues, as much as advice and ideas around the practical side of nutrition and diet. I needed to get over to Susan how I felt aspects of my family life and day to day catering needs were affecting me and discuss “emotional eating”. For example, a student son in the house, who seemed to be constantly preparing or cooking food, often at odd times of the day and night, and a husband who eats very little fruit or vegetables, but lots of red meat; also how to cope with my large social circle where meet-ups almost always involve eating and drinking.

case-study-karen

 

It was very helpful to receive a summary of the points we had discussed – the positives and the negatives – to set some small goals to work towards. Writing is my “thing” – so having it all set down in black and white was a huge help to me. I set up a proper folder and notebook to record my progress.

I was able to ask Susan for some menu ideas – including the really helpful one of “basic recipes” that could be adapted to suit all family members – her website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/blog/category/recipes/ was a treasure trove of ideas. I typed up my own sheet each week ready for the next session with Susan to help me remember positives and negatives, and to record success and questions.

It really helped to recap at the start of each new session what had gone before and for me the pace of change was just fine. It helped to not focus solely on losing weight, although I did lose some along the way.

What worked for me

what-worked-for-me

Getting active!

I realised I really liked my swimming sessions and ensured they were almost in “tablets of stone” in my diary, and still do. They keep me energised and set me up for the day.

I had struggled with a rather sedentary husband who didn’t take much exercise, but managed to get him to join me on walks, and not encourage me into cafes and pubs as a “reward”. I learned tactics such as spotting my danger times – coming home late afternoon to an empty house, or one where other family members don’t greet or bother with me – and to find distractions – not head straight to the biscuit tin but to take time out for a little rest, a cup of herbal tea, read a book, take my DAB radio well away from the kitchen, listen to a podcast.

I became better at keeping a sense of perspective – which is hard, being an all or nothing type of person.

I established much better daily and weekly routines and tried to throw out the scattergun approach – I used printable diary sheets – these also helped me with meal planning.

The holistic approach was absolutely perfect for me as I already knew my problems were not just around food but my whole lifestyle as a semi-retired woman who spends a lot of time at home – and has a big living kitchen where a lot of family activity takes place.

Small permanent changes were exactly what I needed. The 80/20 rule was very helpful – especially as regards my tendency to see things as black and white – and I was only too aware I needed to get some balance back into my life. I became more confident and able to say to friends – let’s not go for coffee and cake, why don’t you come over and we’ll go for a walk (I became more appreciative of the rural area I live in!)

The 80-20 rule

Whilst talking to Susan was like talking to a friend, she did challenge me and not let me get away with being “sloppy” or “airy fairy”. I felt answerable to her, which I liked – Slimming World had “worked” for me in the past because I responded to the pressure of the weekly documented weigh-in!

Moving forward

I have felt recently I could use the occasional “top up” session from time to time, just to keep me on track and stop me being complacent – like I do with my physiotherapist. Maybe such top-ups could form part of a slightly broader package than just the three sessions?

Veg out restaurant review: the Kiosk, Nottingham

Veg out restaurant review: The Kiosk, Nottingham

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

Many of you may recognise the name of the restaurant I recently visited but you may not recognise the venue!

 

inside-shotThe Kiosk in Sherwood was the recipient of my very first Veg Out review for the Nottingham Post back in July 2014. They have since opened up a second café in Cobden Chambers off Pelham Street, Nottingham.

My review is also available via Nottingham Post online, and will be in the hardcopy paper tomorrow.kiosk-review

Beth, the owner left the Sherwood Kiosk in the capable hands of her brother and opened her latest café in early November. She offers the same type of Middle Eastern cuisine but with her touch and flair for colour and great flavour combinations.

So it was with much excitement that I paid them a visit

kiosk-menuMy friend had travelled down from Yorkshire and I was excited to show her what Nottingham could offer. We started with some tap water that was all laid out on the tables with some glasses. After perusing the menu and looking at the specials we were still no nearer making a decision! Then Beth came over to help us out.   She carefully went through the options, describing each dish perfectly and with such care. Our minds were made up; I opted for 3 freshly made salads with a piece of Turkish bread and my friend ordered the flatbread with oil, spices and feta with 2 of the salads.

 

flatbreadSalad #1 was roast heritage carrots on a bed of labneh (hung yoghurt to you and me) topped with singed spring onions and hazelnut dukha. Salad #2 was kushari rice with brown lentils, fried onions, figs and cinnamon. And salad #3 was date Fatush green salad with dates, feta ,crisp breads and date syrup dressing. They were amazing, every mouthful was a delight and different flavours tickled my taste buds. I just wish all vegan and vegetarian food looked and tasted this good

There was no doubt I’d seriously upped my veg and fibre content that lunchtime!

 

hazelnut-dessert

 

We were having such a relaxed time we decided to stay a bit longer and share a dessert, a gluten free hazelnut extravaganza, and a pot of fresh mint tea to accompany it

 

My friend was also impressed with the food; her flatbread was heavenly. But she was equally impressed with the venue. Cobden Chambers seems to be the place to be! The Kiosk is housed in a building (part of the THiNK space) that can be used for meetings, events or just casual get together’s like the one I was enjoying.

 

cakes

 

If you want to try some different flavour combinations, nice healthy portions, and interesting veggie and vegan food the Kiosk at Cobden chambers is the place to go

Gift certificate

Gift certificate – the perfect present!

What’s the best gift you can think of giving? A new pair of shoes, designer handbag or a new road bike like Cav’s? I have a better idea. Consider something really special – give the gift of health. Purchase a gift certificate for nutrition services provided by me!

sample-gift-cert

This is the ideal gift for: 

  • Partner who needs a lifestyle overhaul
  • Parent, sibling or friend who wants to lose weight.
  • Grandchild heading off to University and needs some savvy cooking tips
  • Work colleague who wants more energy.
  • Friends trying a new diet regime such as veganism
  • Loved one with health concerns.
  • Friends and family who need some cooking confidence
  • Anyone who wants to look and feel better – including you!

The certificates can be made up for any amount and can be used in part or full payment.

Examples of the services I offer are:

50 minute nutrition consultation £40

3 nutritional sessions £100

offer

1 vegan or vegetarian cookery lesson £25

6 vegan or vegetarian cookery lessons £125 (6 for the price of 5)

vegan cookery poster jpeg

How to arrange your gift certificate

Simply email me at susan@nutrition-coach.co.uk with the amount you’d like the certificate for and its purpose i.e. cookery lesson, nutrition consultation or healthy eating (if you’re not sure what they would like)

Payment can be made via BACS transfer, Paypal or cheque.

Xmas gift certI will process your request and either email the completed certificate to you for printing or forwarding.  Or post (free of charge) a hard copy to either yourself or to the recipient*

 

*The certificate will not be processed until the payment clears

 

 

 

Certificates printed by Midland Regional Printers, based in Sherwood

 

 

Nutrition and Yoga

Nutrition and Yoga 

I know Christmas is some weeks away but I’m already thinking about the New Year and how frazzled you will all be.

So to help you have a happy and healthy 2017 I’ve teamed up with Kim Rossi to deliver a relaxing and restorative workshop called Nourish the mind and body with nutrition and yoga

kim-yoga-poseKim’s been teaching Yoga for ten years now and has been on a personal journey of self-discovery which has enhanced her practice and  life. Originally trained in Vinyasa but she also draws upon her learning and experiences in connecting with the body, imagery and visualisation, Chinese medicine theory, shiatsu, hypnotherapy and NLP.  Her aim is to fill the world with beauty and love and passion for life.

 

Nottm post feature photoI deliver healthy eating advice to individuals, groups and businesses. By talking informally about how to develop a healthy balanced diet I encourage people to make small but permanent changes to the foods they eat.  Being a chef is a great advantage as it allows me to develop healthy eating recipes for those that need a helping hand.

My vegan cookery classes are a great way to put that knowledge in to practice.  I also deliver regular wellbeing workshops at Maggie’s Cancer support centre at the City hospital in Nottingham. And finally, I write a monthly restaurant review for the Nottingham Post

The nutrition and yoga workshop takes place in West Bridgford on Friday 27th January from 10.30 – 12.45.

 

yoga-and-nutrition-jpeg

For an introductory price of £30 you will participate in a relaxing and nurturing yoga and Housemeditation session, conducted in a beautiful setting with warm underfloor heating

I will be on hand to prepare your  2 course vegan healthy lunch. You can help with the finishing touches, before we all sit down to eat and talk about how to stay healthy over winter

I will share with you my knowledge and experience and give you some nutrition top tips to keep you on track

Contact me on 07946 301338, or Kim on 07940 311061 to find out more or to book your place 

Alpro Go On – review

Alpro Go On – review

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

alpro-topWhat better way to celebrate World vegan month than taste and review a new vegan snack.  Alpro Go On is described as “the new plant-based alternative to strained yogurt”.  We all know the importance of calcium within a healthy balanced diet for bone building, blood clotting, nerve signalling and muscle contraction.

 

We also all need protein, the essential building block to help your body repair cells and make new ones

So a product that contains 18% (144mg) of our daily amount of calcium and nearly 8g of protein is not to be sniffed at.

More nutrition facts

I tried the blackcurrant flavour, there is also a mango and a passion fruit version.  The information on the pot is for both 100 and 150g.  Lets concentrate on 150g, which is the size of the container.

alpro-nutrition

You’ll consume 122 calories, 4.2g of fat (just over 1 teaspoon) but only 0.8 is saturated, 11.3g of sugar (nearly 4 teaspoons), 3g of fibre, 7.7g of protein and a collection of added vitamins and minerals such as vitamin D, B12, E and calcium.  Powerful probiotic yoghurt cultures (S. thermopiles, L. bulgaricus) have also been added, these are great for aiding digestion.

The protein content in the ‘Go on’ range is certainly higher than any of Alpro’s other yogurts

How does that compare with a non vegan strained yoghurt, lets find out  

Danone Danio Blueberry Yoghurt 150g is also described as a high protein low fat strained yogurt with a fruit layer.  

alpro-danone

alpro-sideAlpro’s Go on has fewer calories, less sugar & saturated fat and more fibre.  Danone’s Danio has less fat, more protein and more calcium

On balance they are fairly similar, so Alpro’s version provides a good vegan alternative if you fancy a protein rich yoghurt.  The high fibre content will also keep you feeling fuller for longer. However, I would like to see a lower sugar content.

 

But does it taste good?!

alpro-spoonThe answer is most definitely …… YES!

The texture is very firm, the fruit base gives a lovely fresh taste and it isn’t overly sweet. The different textures in the layers makes it a nice eating experience.  The 150g serving of high protein makes it the perfect mid-morning or afternoon treat.  It will also make a great post-workout snack.  Add some extra fresh fruit and it makes a great dessert.  All for 85p, at most supermarkets and health food shops

These will become a regular addition to my shopping list

Portion control

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

Over 60% of the UK adult population is currently overweight or obese, and we all have a responsibility to reduce that statistic including fast food outlets, schools, supermarkets, cafes and food manufacturers

IMG_2782Research has shown that when people are presented with larger portion sizes, they will eat more and most people underestimate how many calories they consume each day by as much as 25%.

 

 

imagesSince the 1980s, typical servings have increased dramatically: a bag of crisps has grown from 25g to 40g. ‘Big Eat’ bags have 50% more than standard bags – a bag of Walker’s crisps, for example, now contains 55g – that’s 290 calories and 18g of fat, compared to 130 cals and 8g of fat in 25g.

 

Soft drinks are still sold in 330ml cans (139 cals for a can of Coke), but 500ml bottles of are just as popular (210 cals in a bottle of Coke).

IMG_1082King-size and pocket pack chocolate bars are up to twice the size of regular bars – a Mars Big One has 100 calories more than a regular bar, while a King-Sized Snickers has 200 extra calories than the regular version.  There are now even 1 and a half bars of chocolate and Bounty bars are available in triple packs!

Double and triple burgers (with all the extras) are available from every burger chain. If you double-up your cheeseburger in McDonald’s, for example, you increase your calories from 300 to 440, and your fat intake from 11.5g to 23 g.  Pasta servings and nearly five times bigger than they were 20 years ago.

portion control 1 Ready meals have also ballooned over the past 15 years with products such as curry, cottage pies, pasta dishes and casseroles now weighing on average 400g nearly twice the size they were in the 1990’s.

You’re not even safe in the local coffee shop – Your morning caffeine fix in the 50s would be 45 calories. Nowadays, a 16oz (450ml) takeout coffee with mocha syrup would be 350 calories.

 

And how many times are you asked if you want to ‘go large’?

plates2

Modern main course bowl on the left. 1970s plate on the right

 

Even the standard dinner plate used in most restaurants and homes has increased from 10 to 12 inches!

Recent research has revealed that smaller plates, cups, glasses and bowls could reduce overall calorie intake by up to 16 per cent.

 

 

This is called portion distortion and it’s making us fat!
 The more we eat the more calories we consume

Are you shocked by this, did you have any idea that food portion sizes have been on the increase?

To put it in to context eating just 200 extra calories a day over a year can mean a weight gain of over a stone (6.3 Kg)

So what is a correct portion size?

  • A 75g serving of meat, poultry or fish is the same size as the palm of your hand
  • A medium potato is the same size as your computer mouse
  • pasta-portionKeep portions of cheese to 25g – around the same size as a matchbox
  • A medium piece of fruit is the same size as your fist
  • A serving of rice is half a teacup (75g uncooked weight)
  • A serving of vegetables is about 80g
  • A teaspoon of butter or margarine is the size of the tip of your thumb.

A useful guide is to use your hand as a visual template:

palmProtein like meat, fish, poultry, tofu lentils, eggs should be no bigger than the palm of your hand

 

 

 

Carbohydrates like bread rice pasta should fit into one cupped handcupped hand

 

 

 

cupped handsFruit and vegetables should fit in to two cupped hands

Simples!!

 

 

For more information about the increase in portion size please click on this link to the Food Standards Agency booklet http://www.food.gov.uk/multimedia/pdfs/reviewportions.pdf

Winter vegetable and lentil soup

Winter vegetable and lentil soup

Makes 4 x 300g servings = which can be frozen

230 calories per portion

IMG_2129It’s getting colder so what better way to keep out those chills than have a bowl of warming and nutritious homemade soup. Feel free to adjust the vegetables and add in whatever is to hand.  But always use the lentils as it adds protein and fibre, therefore making the soup really hearty and filling.

250g parnsips

150g swede

200g potatoes

100g leek

150g dried red lentils

1 tsp olive oil

1 garlic clove

1 tin of chopped tomatoes

½  vegetable stock cube or 1 tsp bouillon powder

½ litre of hot water

1 tsp coriander

1 tsp cumin

1 chilli or 1 tsp dried chilli

1 bay leave (optional)

Salt and pepper

Dash of lemon juice and a handful of chopped fresh herbs

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Wash all the vegetables but only peel the swede.  Both the parsnips and the potatoes can keep their peel (to retain more fibre and nutrients).  Chop in to bite sized pieces

IMG_2099I use a pressure cooker for this soup as it reduces the cooking time,  But if you don’t have one then use a large pan.  Add the oil to the pan and warm before adding the leeks.  Cook on their own for about 5 minutes, turning occasionally to stop them colouring too much.  Add the rest of the vegetables and stir.  After a few minutes add the chilli, spices, bay leaves, garlic, stock cube dissolved in the hot water and tinned tomatoes.

Give the whole lot a big stir and then add in the dried lentils.  With another big stir

If you are using a pressure cooker at this point add the lid and wait for a steady stream of steam to be produced add the weight, turn down the gas to a simmer and set the timer for 10 minutes.

If you are just using a large pan, cover with a lid, turn down to a simmer and cook for about 30-40 minutes (storing regularly), or until all the veg are nice and soft and the lentils have broken down

Have a taste and then season with salt and pepper and a dash of lemon and some chopped herbs, such as parsley, mint, coriander

IMG_2100You can leave the soup nice and chunky or use a stick blender to make it smooth.  This will thicken the soup so add some more hot water, until you reached the desired consistency.

It may mean that you then get an extra portion so the recipe will have 5 not 4 servings in which case the calorie per portion will reduce to 200

The soup can be kept covered in the fridge for 3 days.  Any uneaten portions can be frozen and defrosted and reheated before eating

As a chunky soup it can quickly be turned in to a versatile casserole by adding cooked veggie sausages, Quorn (or for the meat eaters; roasted chicken or left over Sunday roast meat)

soupAs a smooth soup it can be used as a protein rich topping for jacket pototoes or a filling for a veggie shepherds pie

Please share if you have other creative ways of using this versatile recipe

Foods to boost your immune system

Foods to boost your immune system

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

IMG_3188

 

Working at Maggie’s cancer supper centre in Nottingham, I’m often asked about what foods can help build up our immune system.  This is especially important to cancer patients who may have undergone some quite radical surgery, chemo or radiotherapy.  All of which can have a debilitating effect on the body

 

 

 

img_8426A strong immune system is also important to many us as we enter the autumn and winter months.

To strengthen your immune system it is important to

  • Load up on the foods that pack the biggest nutritional punch
  • Whilst avoiding processed foods (often high in fat and salt) and
  • Reduce the amount of sugar in your diet.
  • You can do even more by selecting foods that are loaded with specific immune boosting nutrients.

Top tips for a healthy immune system

  • chopped veggies

    A rainbow of colour

    Eat a ‘rainbow’ of colour to get more antioxidants in your diet.  By that I mean have plenty of variety,  all the following foods help to nourish the thymus gland, which is responsible for much of the immune-system function.  Eat at least two servings a day of these foods rich in vitamins B, C and E, plus beta-carotene (vitamin A) and zinc – red peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, oranges, apples, tomatoes, kiwi, carrots, berries, red grapes, kale, onions, spinach, sweet potatoes.  You get the idea!

  • Cook frequently with garlic because it’s a proven immune booster and has antiviral and antibacterial properties. The allicin helps to prevent and fight colds. So add it to hummus, pasta and curry dishes. Rub on to toasted sour dough for a low cal garlic bread
  •  spinachSpinach is rich in folic acid. It can be made into spinach pasta, added to soups, smoothies or pasta sauces.  It can brighten up a curry or an omelette and bulk out a salad
  • Cinnamon is antiviral, anti fungal and antibacterial; sprinkle it on your porridge or muesli. Add it to low sugar bakes and biscuits or smoothies
  • Mushrooms – contain vitamin D (and will absorb more if placed on a sunny shelf), which is good at combating viruses. Add to omelettes, stir-fries, soups and pasta dishes

IMG_3501

 

  • Stay hydrated  – try and drink at least 6 glasses of water, fruit teas, green and black teas etc a day

 

 

  • Tactivity exercise walkingake some regular exercise: If you want to boost your immune system, get active. Just increasing your heart rate for only 20 minutes three times a week is associated with an increased immune function, and a brisk walk five days a week can help reduce your risk of catching a cold.  Also being out and socialising can help boost your immune system

 

  • Have a giggle! –  Laughing decreases the levels of stress hormones in the body while increasing a type of white blood cells that fights infection.

 

Tofu scrambled ‘eggs’

Tofu scrambled ‘eggs’ – serves one

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

silken-tofu-on-toastTo continue the celebration of World Vegan Month what better way to start the day than with tofu scrambled ‘eggs’.

Tofu is a great low fat, low cholesterol and high protein ingredient. It is also low in calories; the range depending on the brand is between 60-100 calories per 100g.  The addition of turmeric not only makes this dish the usual ‘eggy’ yellow colour but the anti-inflammatory properties of this spice have been well documented.  It is also currently being studied for its potential affect on Alzheimer disease and diabetes.

 

150g silken or firm tofu; they have very different textures so choose the one that you like best

1tsp coconut oil

½ tsp turmeric

pinch of salt

¼ teaspoon mustard – I like wholegrain

Tofularge pinch of black pepper

1 tsp nutritional yeast

splash lemon juice

 

Drain the water from the tofu; melt oil in a non stick pan.

tofuIf you have firm tofu you will need to press the water out by using a heavy object such as a book

Slice the tofu thinly, add to the pan and cook on medium heat for 3 minutes until the tofu browns. Keep turning the tofu to stop it catching

Add the rest of the ingredients and cook for another few minutes until the tofu egg is brown and crispy

 

 

 

 

TofuServe with some grilled tomatoes, mushrooms or baked beans

Or add to stir-fried veggies and cooked brown rice for a vegan ‘egg’ fried rice