Vegan cookery class – 19th September

Vegan cookery class – 19th September

In West Bridgford

Vegan cookery class tuesday 19th

I have a few spaces left on my next vegan cookery class this Tuesday (19th) at 5.30pm.  We will be making a version of this delicious stuffed aubergine, using lentils and tomatoes with a herby oaty crust

If you can’t make Tuesday 19th.  I always have classes running on the following days and times Monday, Wednesday or Friday from 11 – 12.15pm, Tuesday from 12.15 – 1.30pm and Tuesday evening from 5.30 – 6.45pm

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It only costs £25 and all the ingredients, equipment and recipe sheet are provided.  You just need a container to take it home

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Feel free to take a peak around my kitchen!

 

If you’d like to come along please contact me on 07946 301338 to book your place.

 

Top vegan restaurants in Notts

Top vegan restaurants in Notts

I know its only been three months since I last did a top 5 vegan restaurants list, but In Nottingham (and I’m sure it’s the same further afield) there’s been an explosion in vegetarian and vegan eateries as well as regular places providing vegan only menus

Here are 6 more places I have recently visited that have really proved themselves to be truly catering for vegans.  But if your favourite isn’t on the list then please let me know and I may pay them a visit

In no particularly order

Horse and Plough, Bingham

This rural pub is part of the ever expanding Castle Rock Brewery chain and they are all, to varying degrees vegan friendly.  However, the Horse and Plough is leading the way.  It has a dedicated vegan menu that is mouth wateringly tempting. But don’t just take my word for it take a trip out to Bingham and try their Starburger followed by the delicious chocolate brownie, all washed down with some very quaffable vegan beer

Alchemilla, Nottingham

Recently opened by Alex Bond, this unassuming restaurant serves contemporary British cuisine. There is no hiding from the fact that this is the most expensive restaurant on my list but boy does it deliver!  They serve 5,7 and 10 course tasting menus ranging from £35  to £60.  You can also have a wine pairing menu and they start from £25.  The vegan options, as with the other meat/fish dishes deliver a unique eating experience.  I bet you’ve never had cauliflower, roasted yeast and almonds, or a heritage tomato with lovage puree that looks as pretty as a picture and tastes even better.  As for puddings (yes you get two!); the raspberry, coffee and black garlic dessert will amaze you

Crocus cafe, Lenton

Situated in the heart of Lenton is the Crocus Cafe, a dedicated vegan and vegetarian restaurant with a social conscience.  It is Nottingham’s longest-running community café that is volunteer-led and  not-for-profit. And on top of that it serves food that people love.  The atmosphere is relaxed and inclusive and if you have enjoyed your meal you can enable someone less fortunate to experience it too as the cafe has a ‘suspended’ meal programme meaning you can pay in advance for someone’s else to eat for free

 

Baresca, Nottingham

You’ll find this vibrant restaurant tucked away on Byard Lane.  It is a modern Spanish tapas eatery and part of the Perkins family group.  I was really pleased to see it had a separate vegan menu that offered a full range of animal free delights.  I felt just like every other diner as I couldn’t make my mind up so I over ordered!! Don’t be surprised if like mine your eyes are bigger than your belly!!

Marigold restaurant, West Bridgford

Generally indian restaurants have always catered well for vegans, but the Marigold is exceptional.  For a start the price of the vegetable curries are much less than the meat or fish versions (often a personal bugbear of mine). The portions are generous without making you feel stuffed and the dishes themselves are not oily but more flavoursome relying on delicate spicing (although if you ask for they can also be deliciously hot).  And as if that wasn’t enough they offer a discounted loyalty card making your visit even better value

Angel Microbrewery, Stoney Street

The pub has been around for years and has undergone a recent transformation into a microbrewery.  So not only can you get a decent vegan pint (or half in my case) but it can be accompanied by a rather tasty pulled jackfruit burger.  Or you may be tempted by the pie, ‘fish’ and chips or ‘steak’.  Whichever one you choose save room for pudding!

Vegan cookery classes

Vegan cookery classes – Simply veg!

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

My next set of vegan cookery classes are starting this week!

 

vegan classes sept

The benefits of a plant based diet are regularly reported in the media.  But what does a plant based diet actually look like, and if you were thinking of adding more veg and less meat, fish, eggs and dairy to your diet what do you cook?

I may very well have the answer!  I deliver vegan cookery classes in West Bridgford, Nottingham that will introduce you to the wonders of tofu, the delights of vegan sushi and the occasional but oh so tasty dessert.  The classes take place every Monday, Wednesday or Friday from 11 – 12.15pm, Tuesday from 12.15 – 1.30pm and Tuesday evening from 5.30 – 6.45pm - although the times could be flexible.

 

So what’s in it for you if you sign up?

I will provide all the ingredients, equipment and recipes; you will prepare and cook your very own vegan meal, which you can take home for the family to eat and enjoy

 

vegan cookery testimonial J Pemberton

This is ideal for all you veggie virgins who want to eat less meat but don’t know where to start.  Its also great for would be students who are about to embark on independent living; after all we all know how cheap seasonal veg can be.

Maybe you have a vegan or vegetarian member of the family and you’re struggling to know what healthy and nutritious meals to cook them

Or you want to lose some weight, change your diet, feel fitter, then coming to my ‘simply veg’ class could be just what you’re looking for

The vegan kitchen 

As a lifelong vegetarian, recent convert to veganism and trained chef I will share my knowledge, tips and experience and help you to get that veggie vibe.  I have advised clients for a number of years about how to make small but permanent changes to their diet , so the meals are going to be balanced and nutritious.

5 star

Each class will have a maximum of 4 guests, and rest assured my kitchen is up to scratch having recently been award a 5 star hygiene rating.  I am also the proud owner of a H.O.T award (healthy options takeaway)

 

All this for £25 a session, or if you block book all six you only pay for five i.e. £125

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Susan Hart, nutrition coach

So what are you waiting for?

 

Contact details

07946 301338

susan@nutrition-coach.co.uk

 

Holiday stress

Holiday stress

Are you planning a late summer getaway?

 

Obviously there are things you must do like book the flights, car hire etc, pack (and re-pack), if it’s a ‘hand luggage’ only trip then baggage allowance is a primary concern!

So instead of the holiday distressing you it’s stressing you before you even get on the plane

To help you get the most out of your holiday Hayes & Jarvis, the holiday destination specialist have put together a really useful guide called ‘the four pillars’

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http://www.hayesandjarvis.co.uk/four-pillars-of-holiday-relaxation/

  • Physical
  • Mental
  • Communication
  • Nutritional

They asked me to collaborate with them to produce the nutritional element. In there you will find information about hydration, alcohol and some simple meal planning ideas.

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http://www.hayesandjarvis.co.uk/four-pillars-of-holiday-relaxation/four-pillars.html#three

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I hope you have an enjoyable, relaxing and healthy getaway

Veg out, restaurant review – The Frustrated chef, Beeston

Veg out, restaurant review – The frustrated chef, Beeston

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The name alone is enough to make you want to visit! So I took a trip out to the Frustrated Chef in Beeston one evening with a few friends.

21209079_1980680522201062_1511859067_nMy review is also in the Nottingham Post (online and in the paper)

http://www.nottinghampost.com/whats-on/food-drink/veggie-food-review-frustrated-chef-392819

 

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The restaurant is cosy, rustic and intimate; so far so good. I’d rung ahead to check that they had some options for a vegetarian/vegan and they reassured me they could adapt recipes. One of the group was also dairy and egg free so as a table I think we were quite a challenge.

And in true trooper style they rose to it by presenting us with a separate menu that could accommodate our dietary requirements. Although we did need to clarify a couple of menu options.

table of tapas

As it’s a tapas style restaurant it was suggested that we order two or three small dishes each or more if we were sharing. From our ‘special’ menu we ordered vegan versions of hummus with fried broad beans and crostini (£5) – for some reason we were missing the broad beans, Asian slaw (£6.75) and fine beans with baby corn and a lime and mint dressing (£6.25), spicy Mexican potatoes (£4.50) and mange tout with a chilli and sesame seed dressing (£5.50)

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The others ordered bread with olive oil and balsamic (£3), tandoori monkfish (£9.25), grilled beef sirloin (£10.75), meatballs (£7.25) and almond crusted sea bass (£9.25)

green beans

As with all tapas places the food comes out whenever its ready, which meant some of us had to sit there watching our friends eat. But that’s how it goes!

 

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On the whole I was really pleased with the food the Frustrated Chef offered me. The slaw in particular was incredibly tasty and I would order it again. However it could easily be for two so I would prefer a smaller portion and a smaller price. The hummus was creamy and garlicky and the Mexican potatoes were good and crispy. In general the price of the vegetarian/vegan food was comparatively expensive compared to say the meatballs

 

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Tapas style eating is not cheap, you get over excited by the choice and over order and then the bill comes! I especially felt the small portion of mange tout at £5.50 represented poor value. The fish eaters too were surprised that they only had 3 cubes of marinated monkfish for nearly a tenner!

 

mange tout

That said the ambiance is great, the choice even for vegans is good, the tastes are varied and the pace relaxed.

Pulled jackfruit wrap

PULLED JACKFRUIT WRAP (Its best if you can make this the day before ) serves 3 – 4 people

There are a lot of ingredients here, but the taste and texture is so worth it!  You can make large batches of the pulled jackfruit.  When it’s cooled,  portion it up in to freezer bags and freeze for when you need to eat in a hurry.

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I found the tinned jackfruit and liquid smoke at V Spot, a completely vegan shop in Sherwood, Nottingham  http://www.v-spot.co.uk

 

2 tbsp rapeseed or olive oil

1 small red onion, finely diced

2 cloves garlic, finely diced

½ tsp ground cumin, coriander and smoked paprika

1 pinch ground cinnamon

1 pinch ground cloves or star anise, optional

½ – 1 tsp chilli paste/flakes or powder – I used Gochujang

1 tbsp tomato puree

1 tin of jackfruit in water

1 ½ tbsp soy sauce or tamari

1 tbsp. maple syrup or 2 squares of dark chocolate

½ tsp black pepper

1 tsp liquid smoke**

1 tsp apple cider vinegar

4-5 wholemeal wraps

lots of crunchy salad

avocado salsa – optional 1 avocado, mashed, large pinch chili flakes or ½ fresh chilli, 1-2 tsp lime juice, 1 tomato chopped, 1 spring onion finely sliced, pick of rock/sea salt.

**If you don’t have liquid smoke, you could increase the amount of smoked paprika instead

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  • Heat the oil in a medium, heavy-bottomed, pan. Fry the diced red onion until soft and golden. Add chopped garlic and fry for a few minutes.
  • While that is cooking drain the jackfruit and set aside.

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  • Add the spices to the onions: cumin, smoked paprika, coriander, cinnamon and cloves. Fry for a minute or two, to release the flavours.
  • Mix in the tomato & chilli paste or fresh chilli and again fry for a minute, using a spoon/spatula to keep it from sticking.
  • Add in the jackfruit along with soy sauce, maple syrup, liquid smoke and apple cider vinegar. Mix everything really well. Squash the jackfruit pieces with your spoon or fork so that the individual fibres separate. Season with pepper. Simmer the mixture gently for another 10-15 minutes and then allow it to cool down. Place in the fridge overnight to intensify the flavour. If that’s not possible a couple of hours will do
  • Just before you are ready to assemble the wraps, set the oven to 200° C/ Gas 6 Spread the jackfruit pieces on a baking paper-lined baking tray, pull apart any large pieces and bake for about 20 minutes, until they are browned and crispy. Remove from the oven and let it cool
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baked jackfruit

 

  • Make the salsa if you are having it – Mix all the ingredients together in a bowl.  Check the seasoning. Done!

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  • Finally, fill your wrap with salad spread the pulled jackfruit on top and add a dollop of salsa (if using). Wrap up and enjoy.  2 wraps per person

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Top 5 food tips for students

Top 5 food tips for students

A-level results are out, so for many its now off to University.  You may be completely prepared for it or you might be terrified of what the next three years holds for you.  But either way you will have to be more independent than you probably have been.  And that goes for what you eat.

Follow my 5 simple tips and at least you will have the food side of things sorted!

Tip #1

Try and avoid fast food outlets, takeaways and ready meals.  If that’s not possible limit them to once or twice a week.  The reason being they are heavily processed, contain high amounts of salt, sugar, fat and calories and are often lacking in nutrients.  The result could be weight gain, tiredness, bad skin, irritability, poor sleep and concentration.  Instead focus on plenty of vegetables, fruits, wholegrains, water, nuts and pulses.

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Tip #2

Buy the basics; by that I mean a selection of tins, jars and packets that can quickly be turned in to a nutritious meal.  And don’t be afraid of frozen veg and fruit; they are nutritious, inexpensive, reduce food waste and easy to prepare.

store cupboard basic

 

Do your food shop at the end of the day, when you are more likely to bag bargains like reduced prices.  Also buy food the day before a shop is closed for a public holiday (and they have to get rid of stock).  Buy fresh fruit and veg when its in season – it is bursting with nutritional goodness and also cheaper (often greengrocers or local Asian supermarkets have very reasonably priced items).  But don’t buy food when you are hungry, it will encourage you to buy high fat, sugar processed items

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Tip #3

Buy in bulk.  Dried goods are often cheaper when bought in quantity.  If you haven’t got the space to store lots of food, club together with your friends; share the cost, share the quantity, share the discounts.  Don’t be afraid to shop around; Aldi, Lidl, Coop, Morrisons are often cheaper than the big named supermarkets.

Tip #4

Whilst you’re still at home get some quick and easy recipes under your belt.  Base your meals around vegetables, they are incredibly cheap, nutritious, versatile and easy to cook

  • spaghetti Bolognese – either with mince, Quorn or lentils, tinned tomatoes, lots of herbs, chopped veggies (carrots, peas, sweetcorn, onions, mushrooms courgettes, or wherever you have available) and some stock powder. Served with wholemeal spaghetti (to keep you fuller for longer)
  • Curry – cauliflower and chickpea is simple and cheap.  Fry frozen cauliflower in a pan with a chopped onion.  Add a jar of curry sauce or curry powder/paste.  Add a tin of chickpeas and its water (if using curry powder or paste).  finish with a splash of lemon juice and some fresh coriander (if you want it to look cheffy!

vegan

  • stir-fry – use can use a frozen stir-fry mix and a jar of Sharwoods black bean and pepper sauce (low in sugar).  Add chicken, beans, tofu, nuts or Quorn for protein

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  • cheats risotto – using microwave wholegrain rice, frozen veg and leftover cooked chicken, Quorn, tofu or beans.  You can make it fancy by adding fresh or dried herbs and spices

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Tip #5

If you really don’t know where to start come to my student cookery classes that take place in West Bridgford, Nottingham every Thursday at 2pm

student cooking

Vegan stir-fry

Vegan stir-fry – serves 2 or 3

This recipe makes a really quick and tasty light vegan lunch for three or a more substantial  stir-fry for two.  I think its worth the effort to bake and add in the tofu, but if you really are in a rush then stick with the peanuts/cashews and sesame seeds.  All three ingredients add protein and some useful minerals like iron, calcium and magnesium and all the veggies are bursting with vitamins, fibre and antioxidants.  The spiralised sweet potato is a lighter alternative than rice or noodles.

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1 sweet potato – spiralised into noodles (or ready bought if you haven’t got a gadget!)½  (100g) large onion – sliced2 (130g) carrots – cut into matchsticks1 x (130g) red pepper – sliced

80g spring greens, spinach or mange tout

20g fresh ginger, grated or 1 tsp ‘lazy’ ginger or 1 tsp ginger/garlic paste

¼ – ½ tsp dried chilli flakes

¼ jar of Sharwods black bean and pepper sauce – this has the lowest sugar content of all of the jarred sauces400g of sweetcorn (tinned or frozen)30g unsalted peanuts or cashews1 spring onion – sliced

½ tsp soy sauce or gluten free tamari

1 tsp toasted sesame seeds

For the baked tofu : ½ block extra-firm tofu (drained and pressed in a clean tea towel),, small drizzle of olive oil, 3 tsp light soy sauce, 1 – 1½ tsp gochugaru or sriracha spice

  • Preheat oven to 220C/ gas 7/425F.
  • Cut the tofu into into slices. Place it in a mixing bowl and add the olive oil, chilli sauce/paste and soy sauce. You may need to add a splash of water if it’s too thick. Gently mix to combine.
  • Spread evenly on a baking sheet and bake for 10 minutes.
  • After 10 minutes, remove your baking sheet from the oven and flip each piece of tofu. Drizzle the remaining marinade over the tofu and bake for another 10-12 minutes.
  • Once the tofu is crispy on the outside, remove from the oven. Let it cool before you cut it in to strips

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  • In the meantime spiralises the sweet potato in to ‘noodles’ and blanche in boiling water for two minutes. Remove from the water

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  • Heat the wok until it is really hot and add 1 tsp of vegetable oil. Quickly add the sliced onion and keep them moving in the pan (with a large spoon or chopsticks). After 2 minutes at the carrots. Again move them about to stop them burning. If it looks too dry add a splash of water
  • After another 2 minutes add the pepper, greens, ginger /garlic and chili flakes and ¼ of a jar of sauce. Cook for 5-8 minutes until the veg softens slightly. Again add some water if it sticks

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  • Add the softened sweet potato ‘noodles’ to the wok and mix in. Add the peanuts or tofu, soy sauce, sweetcorn and spring onion and again stir to mix. Cook for a final minute

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Divide into 2 bowls for a generous evening meal serving or into 3 bowls for a lighter lunch or 5:2 fast diet meal. And sprinkle over the toasted sesame seeds

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How to be a healthy vegan

How to be a healthy vegan

What a vegan diet should include (macro and micro nutrients)

 

People have very different reasons for choosing a plant-based diet and for some the transition can be daunting and fraught with complexity.

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Hopefully I can help you navigate your way through and understand what food types, nutrients and minerals you should include in your diet and what if any supplements you should ask your GP about

 

Lets start with the biggie PROTEIN!

Protein, if you didn’t know is a “macronutrient,” meaning you need relatively large amounts of it to stay healthy. Different protein sources contains various amounts of amino acids that help build and repair muscles in our bodies

Vegan protein sources. jpeg

The average UK adult should eat about 50g of protein a day. To be more precise, it’s about 0.75g per kilo of body weight. If you weigh 11 st (70kg) your daily protein intake should be 52.5g. For a vegan that’s about 2 palm-sized portions of tofu, nuts, vegan quorn etc or pulses and beans

Protein rich meal ideas

Carbohydrates

This is another macronutrient, and its fair to say we should and probably do obtain most of our carbs from eating wholegrains, fruits, veg and pulses. And as with any healthy diet the carbs from simple sugars (cakes, biscuits, pastries, processed food etc) should be limited, as they have little nutritional value.

pasta-portionIf you need to lose a kilo or two I would advise you to portion control your bread, rice, pasta and potatoes. A balanced portion of wholegrain pasta or rice is 75g uncooked or 125g cooked. A portion of potato is 80g, and a serving of wholemeal bread is one slice

 

 

Fats

This is the final macronutrient. Its role is to transport fat-soluble vitamins, as a secondary energy source, to keep us warm and to aid brain function. It is the most calorific food at 9 calories a gram compared with protein and carbs at 4 calories a gram. So moderation is the watchword!

Too much fat has been associated with heart disease, obesity and some forms of cancer. With that in mind I would suggest for general cooking, dressings etc you use olive oil or rapeseed oil. Coconut oil has a higher smoking temperature and can be used for deep fat frying and roasting. Be careful of processed, diet foods and ready meals as these can have high levels of fats

vegan-shoppingAs more and more supermarkets are stocking vegan versions of family favourites it is now easier than ever to find vegan cheese, milk, yoghurts and ice cream. But just take a look at the labels and check the fat content as you may be consuming more than the recommended daily amounts of saturated fat (20g for a woman and 30g for a man)

Other fats to incorporate are from avocados, nuts and seeds.  They contain good levels of omega 3 fatty acids

Now we get on to the micronutrients! The foods we need in smaller amounts

 

Vitamins

Many vegans will have been told that they will be lacking in vitamin B12 and D. This of course can be the case but it could also happen to a meat or fish eater. It really depends on the person’s ability to absorb nutrients and how varied and balanced their diet is. That said vegans do have to take more care as B12 especially, is only found naturally in a few foods and most of those are animal in origin

B12

 

Vitamin D is the sunshine vitamin; in order to keep your levels topped up spend about 10 minutes a day outdoors without sun protection. If that isn’t possible some vegan foods are fortified with this vitamin i.e. soya milk, orange juice, cereals and breads. Just make sure your D3 is from vegan sources. There is some evidence that if mushrooms are placed in the sunlight they will synthesise the rays in the same way we do and produce vitamin D enriched mushrooms

 

Calcium

Ryvita hummus

 

This mineral works with vitamin D to produce strong bones and helps maintain the function of our heart, muscles and nerves.

Good vegan sources are green leafy veg like chard, cabbage, spinach, kale, sesame seeds (hummus and tahini), oranges, soya (beans, milk, tofu)

 

 

Iron

Another mineral that vegans may have difficulty consuming because it is found in large quantities in meat and offal. But it is possible to have healthy iron levels if your diet contains some of the following: fortified breakfast cereals, kale, broccoli, watercress, soya based foods, dried prunes, dried apricots, nuts and seeds, beans, pulses and fortified wholemeal bread.

Vitamin C rich foods help with the absorption of iron but tea and coffee can hinder it.

Vitamin C

Quinoa with broad beans, courgette and mint

Quinoa with broad beans, courgette and mint –  serves 2

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My simple summer dish has appeared in the latest addition of Aspect  Nottinghamshire, a local magazine showcasing “all of what’s good in Nottinghamshire”

 

 

 

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If you can’t get hold of a copy then the full recipe is below

 

At this time of year both broad beans and courgettes are at their best and this recipe makes great use of them.  Out of season you can use frozen broad beans, soya beans, peas or broccoli.  Now you seem to be able to get courgettes all year round but if you fancy a change why not use leeks when they are in season, which is November through to April.   And if you tire of quinoa (pronounced keen-wha) try using giant couscous or experiment with freekeh (green wheat)

But before you go off piste give this recipe a go and like me, I’m sure you’ll love it!

quinoa and broad bean

90g uncooked quinoa

300 ml of hot stock (made with ½ tsp vegetable bouillon powder like Marigold)

quinoa and broad bean100g of fresh podded broad beans or frozen –  its worth making the effort to remove the outer greyish skin; the result is a much more vibrant green bean

1½ large courgettes (250g) cut into thick slices

1 tsp oil

large pinch of dried chilli flakes or ½ a fresh chilli finely chopped

handful of chopped fresh mint and parsley

1 tsp lemon juice

large pinch black pepper small pinch sea salt

 

Put the quinoa in a pan and add the hot stock and cook for 15 minutes on a low heat. Then add the fresh or frozen broad beans and cook for a further 5 minutes until the beans and quinoa are soft

In the meantime brush the courgettes with oil and a few chilli flakes and fry in a pan or griddle for about 10 minutes

Place the cooked quinoa in a bowl and add the cooked courgettes, chopped mint, parsley and lemon juice.  Season with salt and pepper and divide in to two bowls

quinoa and broad bean

Enjoy!