Peanut butter truffles

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

Makes 30 truffles

IMG_5442200g wholenut crunchy peanut butter

20g wholegrain puffed rice – toasted, cooled and lightly crushed

¼ tsp Vanilla extract

2 tsp Golden syrup

1 tsp Chia seeds

1 tsp  toasted sesame seeds

75g Dark cholocalte

1 tsp Coconut oil

 

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Mix the first six ingredients together. Blend well

Line a tray with Clingfilm and shape the mixture in to 30 small balls. Keep wetting your hands with cold water to stop the mixture from sticking to you

Leave the balls to firm up in for fridge for at least 30 minutes

Melt the chocolate and coconut oil in a pan over a bowl of hot water or microwave on high for 1- ½ minutes

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Remove the peanut balls from the fridge and dip each one in the chocolate. Place on the clingfilmed tray to set. Crush a few grains of rock salt over the coated peanut balls

Healthy eating – Fact and fiction

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

In general all foods can form part of a healthy balanced diet as long as you practice portion control and don’t eat too much of any one group

Fruit and sugar

fruit-image-for-5-2-flyer1It is true fruits contain sugar, in the form of fructose.  But unlike pure sugar they also contains fibre, water, polyphenols, minerals and vitamins.   I would always advocate trying to eat most of your fruit whole, so you access all the nutrients, you also help your digestion by chewing the food and releasing digestive enzymes. And go for variety, red, green, yellow, orange or purple; they’re all good Homemade smoothies will count towards your five a day, but try not to peel the fruit and add some veggies for extra fibre and nutrients. A tablespoon of ordinary porridge oats will add soluble fibre; again this will slow down the rate at which the smoothie (and sugar) is absorbed keeping you fuller for longer and balancing out your blood sugar levels.

Steer clear of shop bought varieties unless it is an occasional treat as they often contain higher amounts of sugar and preservatives

Water

IMG_3503If you don’t get enough fluid you may feel tired, have poor concentration, get headaches and not perform at your best. Try and aim for 6-8 glasses of water a day. But other liquids can also count towards that tally – green tea, black coffee, milk (and non dairy milks), weak squashes, tea, coconut water, herbal teas etc. Water is still considered the best for hydration. It is also widely available, contains no calories and is free from your tap. For the record, alcohol does not count!

 

Couples eating habits

IMG_5377The latest research shows that middle aged couples who develop the same eating habits could increase their risk of becoming obese.  But the opposite may also be true; if one person eats healthily their partner may imitate those choices

 

 

Red wine

IMG_5006Contains some antioxidants that can offer some protection from heart disease. This protection is greater for men and post menopausal women. The benefit is lost if you consume more than 2 units a day, or one 175 ml glass

 

 

Carbohydrates from bread, rice, pasta and potatoes

WholegrainsA maximum of a 1/3rd of our diet should come from this group, and preferably wholegrain as they contain more vitamins and minerals and importantly more fibre; this helps us to keep fuller for longer by releasing energy slowly. Wholegrain carbs are also linked to a reduction in cholesterol and better digestive health.  A portion is generally 75g (uncooked weight)

What foods form part of your healthy eating regime?

 

Veg out review – handmade burger Co, Nottingham

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

 

IMG_5384I always like a bargain, so it was with great excitement I came across a voucher for the new handmade burger restaurant in Nottingham. The restaurant is situated in the recently revamped part of Victoria centre. So I was keen to give it a try

 

I downloaded my 50% of any vegan burger and I was good to go!   All I needed was my meat-eating sister to accompany me

Screen Shot 2016-02-22 at 18.08.56My review is now available on line via the Nottingham Post http://www.nottinghampost.com/Veg-veggie-nutrition-coach-Susan-Hart-Handmade/story-28783210-detail/story.html

 

 

 

IMG_5369We arrived on a Tuesday lunchtime and it was surprising busy, I would even say ‘buzzing’. We were quickly seated and as we were ‘Handmade’ newbies, the server spent some time explaining the menu and talking us through the options.

 

I had about 6 or 7 vegetarian or vegan burgers to choose from, my sister took slightly longer to make her choice because of the extensive 50 burger menu.   A quick trip to the till and we’d ordered a small vegetable & bean burger for me (£4.25) minus the bun but with a mixed salad. My sister ordered a small beef cheese classic (£5,25), again minus the bun and with a salad (the other alternative is a bowl of freshly prepared coleslaw). And we shared a bowl of rosemary salt seasoned chips (£3.45) – recommend by our server

 

About 15 minutes later the dishes arrived and we weren’t disappointed. My vegan burger was really tasty with a good hit of spice and heat. My sister said her beef burger was one of the best she’s had; very moist and tasty. And the server was right to recommend the rosemary chips they were heavenly, and one portion was definitely enough for two

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Vegan Vegetable and bean burger

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Beef and cheese classic

 

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And that brings me on to why I like this place so much. You pay for what you want not what they want to serve you. All the burgers come with a small salad as standard and that’s it. If you want chips, toppings and other sides you have to pay extra. So it encourages me to really consider how hungry I am and to choose accordingly

 

However If I was really hungry and wanted the full works of a veggie burger, with extra toppings like cheese and mushrooms, a side salad (with toppings) and two sides it could possibly cost me upwards of £15. But I know I wouldn’t be able to finish it all and I wouldn’t need to eat for the rest of the day. What I had was more than adequate for a lunchtime meal

With my 50% off voucher, courtesy of Veganuary my meal came to under a fiver.

 

I will certainly be returning to handmade burger Co with or without a voucher!

Handmade voucher

 

By the way the voucher is valid until the 29th February, so what’s stopping you?!

 

Vegan tofu sausages

Tofu sausages – serves 3 (2 per serving)

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These sausages are vegan and are great at breakfast with some beans and hash brown, or packed between two slices of wholemeal bread with some fried onions and ketchup to make the perfect sausage sandwich.

You can also make them in to little balls before frying them.  Then add to a rich tomato sauce and serve with some wholemeal spaghetti and fresh basil, for a delicious vegan ‘meatball’ supper

 

  • 1 onion, grated or chopped finely, or cut into quarters first if using hand blender
  • 2 tsps mustard
  • 2 tsps vegetable bouillon powder
  • 2 cloves crushed garlic
  • 2 tsps dried thyme
  • 1 tsp dried chilli flakes
  • 8 sage leaves – chopped
  • 1 block soft tofu
  • 1 tbls tomato puree
  • Salt and 1½ tsp of black pepper
  • 2 cups (180g) rolled oats or wholemeal breadcrumbs
  • seasoned wholemeal flour and oil for frying
  • images Place all the ingredients listed above (except the rolled oats/breadcrumbs) into a bowl, and mix using a hand blender.  Alternatively mash tofu in a bowl and add then add ingredients as listed. Mix well.
  • Add in the rolled oats/ breadcrumbs.
  • Allow it to stand to half an hour minimum which helps the flavour to develop and the mixture to firm up.
  • Make into sausage shapes, roll in flour and fry over medium heat in fry pan with a little oil for 20 minutes
  • Makes 6 x 70-75g sausages

IMG_1894They can simply be added to a tin of tomatoes, some veggies and spice for a delicious sausage casserole.  Perfect for a chilly evening

Why not share your favourite sausage recipe?

Did we have a healthier diet in World War 2?

Did we have a healthier diet during World War 2?

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

This question was posed to me by the editor of ‘Nottingham Live’; an online magazine. Initially my assumption was ‘No’, because we now have greater choice, better farming methods and a greater understanding of what makes a healthy balanced diet. But I wasn’t completely right.

 

imagesDid you know that we eat about the same amount of calories as we did in the 40s, but those calories come from different food sources and it probably comes as no surprise to hear that ‘sugar’ is where the major difference is. During the war it was rationed to 225g per person a week, that equates to 56 teaspoons. Some of you may think that’s quite generous, but back in those days convenience foods were rare so cakes, jams and biscuits were nearly always homemade, using some of the 56 teaspoons

_75844736_2010623_daily_added_sugar_v3Cancer Research UK has today revealed that children aged between 11 and 16 consume about 75g of sugar a day, or 19 teaspoons (mostly in the form of sugary drinks); that’s 575g, or more than double a weeks worth of sugar rationing during the war

 

WW2 food. food Nottingham

 

If you’d like to read the complete article, then please follow this link http://www.nottinghamlive.co.uk/live/food-nutrition-coach-susan-hart-takes-a-look-at-wartime-food-and-diet/

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The latest National Food Survey also reveals we are a nation of ‘convenience food’ consumers; especially pizza and chips

 

A diet high in fat, salt and sugar could explain why there are 6 million pre diabetic patients in the UK. Simple changes to IMG_4250dietary habits could have a positive impact on that figure. By incorporating more oats and vegetables (for their fibre and low GI) in to our diets and possibly consider a regime like 5: 2 fasting to reduce our overall calorie consumption, people could not only lose the dangerous fat from around their middle , but potentially move out of the pre-diabetic category

 

shopping 1950sAnother noticeable difference between the lifestyle of the 1940s and todays was the level of activity that we did then. We didn’t rely on the car as much, our main form of regular transport was the bike or our feet.  We also had fewer labour saving devises so women spend about 70 hours a week doing housework and manual work was also more common

 

So maybe next time you order that large sugar laden drink and burger at the fast food drive through consider if there is a healthier alternative

Huevos Rancheros

Huevos Rancheros – Mexican eggs (serves 2)

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

IMG_5324This is a great brunch dish, light lunch with a slice of toasted sourdough bread or a substantial supper if you add some delicious and nutritious sweet potato wedges.

Eggs are a great addition to a healthy balanced diet.  Being a ‘complete’ source of protein, they contain all eight essential amino acids; the ones you can’t make in your body and must obtain from the foods you eat.  As well as protein they are also high in essential fatty acids, both of which have a satiety value that helps keep you feeling fuller for longer.

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I love the sourdough from of  a local baker; http://www.smallfoodbakery.com and the free range eggs are from another local supplier http://www.parsnipsandpears.co.uk

 

This recipe can easily be halved for an individual portion

 

 

Ingredients

2 handfuls of spinach leaves, finely chopped

½ onion, finely chopped

IMG_3633½ green pepper, finely chopped

½ red pepper, finely chopped

1 small bird’s eye chilli, finely chopped (less if you don’t want it too spicy) or ½ tsp dried chilli flakes

½ courgette, finely chopped

1 garlic clove, finely chopped

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

75ml tomato passata or 1 x 400g tin of tomatoes

1 tbsp olive oil

4 free-range eggs (2 eggs per person)

To serve

Handful fresh coriander or parsley leaves

Wholemeal tortillas or baked sweet potato wedges

Heat the oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat and add the spinach, onion, peppers, chilli, courgette, garlic and passata (or tinned tomatoes). Season, to taste, with salt and freshly ground black pepper and mix well.  At this point you can cube up the bread and add to the mix, or slice and toast it and serve the Huevos Rancheros on top; your choice

IMG_5321Cook until the vegetables are soft – about 10-15 minutes, then make 4 wells in the middle of the sauce. Break the eggs into this space.

Place a lid over the pan and cook for 3-4 minutes. The dish is ready when the yolks are cooked and the whites are firm.

To serve, sprinkle each dish with coriander leaves and serve the warm tortillas, sourdough toast or baked sweet potato wedges.

5 foods to get you in the mood for Valentines Day

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

5 foods to get you in the mood for Valentines Day

As well as cards, love tokens and candles why not set the scene and use food to get you both completely in the mood for love!

IMG_5123Brazil nuts are packed with feel-good selenium, a mineral many of us don’t get enough of. 3 or 4 nuts a day will put a smile on your face and help make you feel happier. So why not start the evening with a few Brazil nuts and a glass of fizz

 

According to English herbalist Nicholas Culpepper in the 17th century, Asparagus “stirs imagesup lust in man and woman.” Apart from its obvious phallic shape, asparagus is high in potassium, fibre, vitamins B6, A and C, thiamin and folic acid.  It also contains nutrients that boost histamine production, which can get you in the mood for love

Simply steam some asparagus in a pan of boiling water for 5 minutes.  Serve on a plate with a  drizzle of olive oil, cracked black pepper, a few chilli flakes and a squeeze of lemon

IMG_4449Spices like as chilli, curry, cayenne, turmeric, ginger and cumin can make you feel amorous because they warm and relax the body.  The hot compound found in chillis also increases heart rate and triggers the release of mood-enhancing endorphins. Just remember to wash your hands before you get too amorous, if not things could get hotter than you intended!

So for your Valentines meal why not serve up a spicy curry dish, and feel the lurve!

Dark Chocolate prompts the release of the mood-boosting hormone serotonin. just a couple of squares are enough to release endorphins: hormones that create a natural high. It also contains caffeine, phenylethylamine and magnesium, which are known to lift the spirits and increases alertness … and passion

Strawberries are perfect for Valentines Day, not only are they red but heart shaped too!  imagesBeing low in calories (50 calories in 8 strawberries), bursting with vitamin C and high in fibre (5g per serving) they are a sweet treat that fills you up without adding the pounds.

So why not end your Valentine’s day meal with chocolate covered strawberries – A sure fired way to win your loved ones heart

 

 

What is your favourite meal to woo your loved one?

Is your friend naturally skinny – Probably not!

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

Is your friend naturally skinny – Probably not!

You seem to eat the same but you put on weight and she doesn’t.  These 10 skinny secrets might explain why!

Enjoy breakfast – Your friend very rarely skips breakfast.  A study by the National IMG_3797Weight Control Registry (NWCR) confirmed that people who have lost weight were 80% more likely to keep it off if they ate breakfast.  Their daily calorie consumption was no more than people who didn’t eat breakfast.  Why not try scrambled eggs on wholemeal toast or my favourite eggy bread for a protein rich start to the day, or a bowl of porridge with a sliced banana and some blueberries on top to keep you full until lunchtime

Portion control – Have you considered how much you or your friend eat at each meal?  Simagesupermarkets, restaurants and café’s are going large!  For instance packets of crisps are now often sold as 50g grab bags rather than the smaller (and now rarer) 25g, restaurant plates and bowls are bigger so we are eating more when we eat out, and how often are you only offered a large latte when you order a coffee.  Upselling is a common practice in food outlets the classic being ‘do you want fries with that’!  Learn to say no and only eat what you need.

IMG_5039Alcohol – The same goes for alcohol; a standard glass of wine is at least 175ml or maybe even 250ml (or a ⅓ of a bottle).  If your friend orders a small glass of white wine and you have the largest and over the course of a night out you drink 4 glasses each.  She will have consumed 15 ½ units, over 1100 calories or the equivalent of nearly four burgers.  It would take just under 2 hours of running to burn off those calories alone

That compares to your four large glasses which is 28 ½ units, over 2000 calories or the equivalent of seven burgers.  It would take 3 hours 20 minutes to run off those calories

Take your time – We live in a fast paced environment; we text, email, instagram, fast forward commercials and we eat at a much quicker rate than we use imagesto and with lots of distractions.  How many times have you seen someone driving a car whilst eating a burger, or takeaway drink?  It is time to slow down and follow the wise words of our grandparents; chew your food slowly, put down you knife and fork in between mouthfuls and eat at the table.  Why is this so important?

It allows the ‘I’m full’ message to go from our stomach to our brain so that we stop when we’ve had enough and we don’t overeat.  Next time you go for a meal with your skinny friend notice how slowly she eats and match her pace

80/20 rule- This is about applying healthy eating principles 80% of the time and being imagesmore relaxed 20% of the time.  In reality that could mean whenever you go out for a meal 80% of the time you don’t have a pudding, but 20% of the time you do.  The theory behind it is that if you try for 100% all of the time you will fail but be a bit more realistic and you are more likely to stick at your healthy eating goals.  I bet your skinny friend doesn’t always have 3 courses when you eat out, or maybe they only have a small glass of wine with their meal.  It might be a good idea to follow their lead

 

imagesBe mindful – Does your skinny friend often refuse a biscuit because she is simply not hungry? This is called eating consciously; being aware of how hungry you are and stopping when you feel satisfied.

 

imagesEarly morning exercise – You and your friend might both have gym membership or enjoy an outdoor power walk but does she do most of her exercise in the morning?  If you exercise before breakfast you could burn 20% more fat.  Some people assume that if you exercise in the morning you will feel hungrier throughout the day and therefore your overall calorie intake goes up but this is not always the case.  Justine Jenkins, Director Vitalitybootcamps and a Health & Fitness Consultant (vitality bootcamps) said “I promote eating a smart breakfast -high protein then you can train at a high rate and not fatigue like you would if you have fasted whilst still benefiting from fat loss”.

Cook more - Cooking at home puts you back in the driving seat of calorie consumption.  Not only have you chosen the ingredients but you can also choose the portion size.  A homemade tomato based curry has far fewer calories than the creamyIMG_2807 korma you might have picked up from the takeaway.  The salmon sirfry that you created is far more nutritious than the sweet and sour version from the local Chinese restaurant.

Read food labels – The nutritional information on food labels will give you a clear picture of the calories, fats and sugars as well as the main ingredients.  It can help you to make an informed decision as to whether or not you buy it.  For instance if you bought a fish pie ready meal you’d like to see ‘fish’ as one of the top ingredient but you may not be quite so keen to eat it if the dish only contained 14% fish.

Buddy up – Eat out with your skinny friend and follow her lead.  She might order soup as a starter (often a lower calorie option and it fills you up), with her main she may skip the chips and ask for a salad with the dressing on the side.  And order a sorbet or fresh fruit salad for dessert, or miss it altogether if she is full.  Watch what she drinks too; does she avoid the sugary and calorie laden cocktails and instead orders a small glass of wine with a glass of water

Nottm Post WinterGet some advice – If all of this is just too much to take in then why not contact me for a FREE 20 minute consultation and I can take you through it step by step and also help you to make healthier food choices, so that you and your skinny friend will soon be able to swap clothes!

07946 301338,  @SH_nutrition, susan@nutrition-coach.co.uk

What have you got to lose?!

Pancake day

Pancake day

If you’ve never flipped before then flip today!

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

Basic pancake recipe

Makes about 8IMG_0706

110g plain wholemeal  flour or ground oats (ground in a coffee grinder or nutribullet)

1 large egg

330ml milk, or half milk half water (you can also use coconut/ almond/ soya/oat milk)

Put the flour in a large bowl and make a well in the middle. Whisk the egg and milk together in a jug or bowl. Pour about a quarter of the milk/egg mixture into the well, plus a pinch of salt.

Whisk together, drawing in the flour gradually, until it is all incorporated as a smooth paste. Add the rest of the milk/egg and whisk until smooth.

If you have time, leave to rest for an hour or overnight in the fridge: this really does make for a lighter pancake. But it’s not compulsory.

imagesLightly oil a small frying pan and heat on a medium flame.  Pour in a ladle spoonful of the batter and tip the pan so that the batter coats the bottom. Cook for a few minutes then flip the pancake over and cook for another minute.  Tip onto a plate and make another one.  The first pancake may stick and not be perfect but persevere they will get better

Now its time to pimp up your pancake!

  • imagesSpread a large teaspoon of wholenut peanut butter onto your pancake and add a sliced banana. if the peanut butter is too thick water it down with a splash of milk
  • Scramble two eggs (with a pinch of dried chilli flakes) and wilt a handful of spinach. or a couple of blocks of frozen spinach cooked  Spread the spinach over the pancake.  Sprinkle with ground black pepper and top with IMG_5114scrambled egg
  • Warm two handfuls of blueberries in a dry frying pan, until a few burst. Pour onto the pancake drizzle a small amount of runny honey and scatter over a teaspoon of pumpkin seeds serve with a dollop of Skry yoghurt for a great protein boost
  • IMG_3612Spread a table spoon of natural or dairy free yoghurt over the pancake, add a few chunks of fresh pineapple and sprinkle over a few dried chilli flakes
  • imagesFry some mushrooms and garlic in a small amount of oil.  Add a few leaves of fresh thyme or a pinch of dried.  Add a tablespoon of natural or non dairy yoghurt and a large pinch of black pepper.  Warm through and spoon on to the pancake

Why not share how you pimped your pancakes this year?

Healthy veggie Singapore noodles

Healthy veggie Singapore noodles – serves 4, 350 calories per portion 

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

 

  • IMG_52913 x 150g packets of straight to wok wholemeal noodles or some spiralised courgette or sweet potato ‘noodles’
  • 2 tsp sunflower oil
  • 100g broccoli, including the stalks cut into florets
  • 85g of frozen peas
  • 1 red pepper, deseeded and cut into strips
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 red chilli, deseeded and finely sliced
  • 1 “ piece fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped
  • 150g of defrosted Quorn pieces or tofu
  • 50g unsalted cashew nuts
  • 1 heaped tbsp curry pasteIMG_1381
  • 2 tsp soy sauce
  • 100g beansprouts
  • 15g coriander leaves, chopped
  • 3 spring onions, sliced
  • lime wedges, for squeezing or a splash of lemon juice
  • 1 tsp toasted sesame seeds
  • Heat the oil in a large non-stick wok and stir-fry the broccoli and peppers with the garlic, chilli and ginger for 5 minutes.
  • Add the Quorn or tofu and cook for a further 5 minutes,  add some hot water if its sticking or too dry . Tip on to a plate and keep warm.  Add the curry paste to the pan, stir-fry for a few seconds then add 150ml water and the soy sauce. Allow to bubble then add the noodles and beansprouts, and toss together to coat. Cook for 3-4 minutes
  • IMG_1464Return the vegetables and Quorn/tofu to the wok with the chopped coriander, spring onions and cashew nuts. Stir well and serve with lime wedges or add a splash of lemon juice.  Sprinkle over the sesame seeds

If you’d like to know more about healthy takeaways have a look at a previous blog http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/blog/chinese-ny2016/