The big lunch launch

The big lunch launch

The West Bridgford Wire showcased a new exciting initiative that is taking place in Nottingham City centre next week

big lunch

https://westbridgfordwire.com/nottingham-big-lunch-gets-ready-for-launch/?utm_source=West+Bridgford+Wire+Daily+Newsletter&utm_campaign=3ba7839f08-Wire+Daily+Newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_38341112ed-3ba7839f08-432354685

Nottingham Business Improvement District (BID), have come up with this idea, taking place from Monday 21 May to Friday 25 May 2018. The aim is to persuade people to change their normal routine by leaving their desks and encouraging them to get out and discover Nottingham’s amazing choice of eateries.

The only catch is……..

To obtain one of the 1,300 free lunches, you must work at businesses who are BID members.

Establishments that have signed up to this initiative include  Harts, Jamie’s Italian, Pit & Pendulum, Cock & Hoop, Malt Cross, The Castle, The Cheese Shop and The Herbert Kilpin.

I’m happy to support the big lunch because the ‘lunch hour’ is becoming a thing of the past, with workers often forgoing their lunch or eating at their desk.

Time-taken-for-lunch-break-graphics

Image attribution to http://www.savoystewart.co.uk/ .

A lunch break away from your desk (no matter how short) can have both personal and business benefits

  • improves concentration
  • movement makes the body weight bearing
  • potentially increases vitamin D levels
  • releases happy hormones
  • improve productivity, focus and creativity

taco4With a wealth of cafes and eateries in Nottingham you’ve got no excuse for taking a break.  Or why not make a healthy packed lunch including some wholemeal carbs, lots of vegetables or salad and some low fat protein

The weather looks set to be good next week, so folks no excuses leave your desk and workstations and go and find free food

 

Next yoga and healthy eating class

NEXT YOGA AND HEALTHY EATING CLASS

MONDAY 18TH June 2018 FROM 10.30 – 12.45pm
IN WEST BRIDGFORD
THE COST IS £30

 

yoga nutrition
Why not come and join a small group of mixed ability yoga students practicing gentle, mindful Yoga in a beautiful calm space that has underfloor heating.
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Debbie will guide you through gentle, relaxing but specific movements that will help with general flexibility, mobility, balance and strength.  In a small group like this she can spend time with each person to make sure they are in the correct position to maximise a pose.  The yoga session will close with a guided meditation where you can let go into your body and breath; leaving you feeling relaxed and at ease.

If its nice and sunny we will throw open the patio windows or even spill out on to the lawn

garden

 

This will be followed by a healthy vegan buffet made by me.  We’ll spend time relaxing  around the table and as a trained nutrition coach and chef I will share some of my nutritional expertise, deliver tips for healthy eating and answer any questions.  All whilst you all enjoy a healthy balanced vegan buffet lunch.  Debbie will also be on hand to answer any specific questions about her yoga practice.
Here’s a taste of the food that will tantalise your tastebuds:
Wholesome soup, colourful quinoa salad, herby flatbreads, decadent chocolate pots, banana bread and fresh fruit.  All served with refreshments

This is a great time to get to know your fellow students and to ask us questions about yoga, healthy eating, lifestyle changes etc.

 

 

 

 

The whole event will leave you feeling nourished and balanced.
All this for £30
Contact either Susan on 07946 301338 or Debbie on 07941 526136

We are limited to 8 people so book early to guarantee your place

If we get booked up don’t worry we have more in the pipeline for the rest of the year

Our next ones are  30th July and 13th August – details below

yoga july

 

Yoga nutrition aug

“Must haves” for a healthy balanced diet

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

“Must haves” for a healthy balanced diet

Do you think you eat a balanced diet or are you confused about what a balanced diet looks like?

I’m seeing more and more clients who seem lost and confused about what to eat and what not to eat

thai-tofu-curryEating a nutritious, balanced diet will help you improve your overall health. In particular, a balanced diet can help:

  • Reduce your risk of heart disease and high blood pressure
  • Reduce your chances of getting cancer
  • Give you more energy
  • Keep you well
  • improve weight loss
  • Improve your bowel health
  • Your skin, nails and hair look healthier

 

The two key elements to a healthy balanced diet are:

  • Eat the right amount of food for how active you are, and
  • Eat a variety of foods – this is where the ‘balance’ comes in

healthy eating advice

The “Must haves” for a healthy balanced diet should include:

  • fruit-and-veg-225x300Plenty of fruit and vegetables – at least 5 portions a day. Think ‘A rainbow of colour’.  And if its convenient use fresh, frozen or tinned
  • Fruit like grapefruit or melon eaten before a meal can help fill you up so you are less likely to overeat on higher calorie foods
  • Small amounts of bread, rice, potatoes, pasta and other starchy foods (choosing wholegrain varieties when possible)
  • Some milk, dairy or plant-based alternative likes (soya, oat, nut etc).  Aim for 3 servings a day.
  • Sufficient protein such as tofu, Quorn, quinoa, nuts, beans, meat, fish, eggs.  Aim to eat low fat protein at every main meal.
  • Just a small amount of foods high in fat, sugar and salt
  • Keep within the safe alcohol limits (14 units a week for men and women).  Its also advised to have alcohol free days
  • activity exercise walkingDrink plenty of water, about 6-8 glasses (or other fluids) every day: more if you exercise or if the weather is hot
  • Green tea contains two compounds; caffeine and catechins, that may boost your metabolism for a couple of hours.
  • Stay active – aim for 150 minutes of activity a week.  this can include classes at a gym, running, weight training.  But equally housework, gardening, walking and dancing can all count too

 

Some people make the mistake of thinking that because they are eating healthy food they can eat more of it.  This can lead to weight gain in the same way that eating unhealthy foods can, because all foods have calories!

Follow this portion guide and you won’t go far wrong

  • A healthy 75g serving of protein (tofu, Quorn, quinoa, nuts, beans, meat, fish, eggs) is the same size as the palm of your hand
  • A medium potato is the same size as your computer mouse
  •   A serving of dairy is:
    • 200ml of milk or plant based alternative – regardless of full-fat, semi-skimmed or skimmed.
    • 30g hard cheese (including non dairy): around the same size as a matchbox
    • 150g of plain or fruit yoghurt.
  • A medium piece of fruit is the same size as your fist
  • pasta-portionA serving of rice is half a teacup or 75g (uncooked), which weighs 125g when cooked
  • A serving of pasta is 75g uncooked which weighs 170g when cooked al dente
  • A serving of vegetables is about 80g or about 2 tablespoons
  • A teaspoon of butter or margarine is the size of the tip of your thumb.
  • A unit of alcohol is half a pint of standard strength (3 to 5% ABV) beer, lager or cider, or a single pub measure of spirit. A 175 ml glass of wine is about 2 units and alcopops are about 1.5 units. A bottle of white wine has up to 9 units and 650 calories

If your diet is in a bit of a tailspin, then why not contact me for some nutritional advice

what i do 4

The sugar tax and sugary drinks

The sugar tax and sugary drinks

On 6th April 2018 the new sugar tax came in to force, meaning manufacturers have to pay a levy on the high-sugar drinks they sell.  Drinks with more than 8g per 100ml will have a tax rate equivalent to 24p per litre.  Those containing 5-8g of sugar per 100ml, a slightly lower rate of tax, of 18p per litre.   In many cases the tax has been passed on to the consumer.

Pure fruit juices will be exempt as they do not carry added sugar, and milky drinks will also be exempt due to their calcium content.

Ministers and campaigners already believe it to be a success, with many firms reducing sugar content ahead of the change. Leading brands such as Fanta, Ribena and Lucozade have cut the sugar content of drinks, but Coca-Cola has not.

sugar_in_drinks_640-nc

Yesterday was also a busy day for me with filming for Notts TV about less sugary cereal alternatives, an Interview with BBC Radio Nottingham’s Verity Cowley and a couple of mentions on Gem106 fm evening news

sugar tax

 

Firstly Notts TV

Sugary cereals are a big concern as many of us choose this option as our go to breakfast, some children can consume near 3 teaspoons of added sugar before they even leave the house in the morning

Two short 20 second clips from Gem 106

And this is the last of my media clips: a 6 minute chat with Verity Cowley on her BBC Radio Nottingham show

 

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Whether you restrict your sugar intake or switch to artificial sweeteners the best advice I can give you is to educate your pallet to expect less sweet food.

Cheers to vegan beer

Cheers to vegan beer!

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

With the rise in popularity of cask ales and craft beers, I’ve noticed over the last year or so a number of establishments have started serving unfined vegan beer and lager. Breweries that saw the potential for this un-tapped (sorry!) market include Magpie, Angel Microbrewery, Brewdog and Castle Rock. Many of them also serve tasty vegan food too

crafty crow outside

angel

Angel

 

Magpie, a Nottingham based brewery is sold in two local pubs; Crafty Crow opposite Nottingham castle and Doctor’s orders on Mansfield Road, Carrington. I visited the crafty crow on two occasions, the first time they didn’t have any vegan beers on tap. The second time was more successful and I had the choice of one draft beer and a couple of craft beers and a few lager’s.

crafty crow label

I opted for the draft cherry raven, a rather tasty dark cherry stout. It looked so appetising and didn’t disappoint; not too sweet or fruity. The pub also has a food menu, but with only one choice of starter and main, I’d probably go elsewhere to eat.

crafty crowe

One of my volunteers (Paul Clarke) visited their other hostelry; Doctor’s orders, an incredibly small intimate place but they were able to offer a Magpie ale. Unfortunately the pumps were not clearly labelled and the staff didn’t know that another beer from the Framework brewery was also vegan. Being so small they don’t serve any vegan food options other than snacks.

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You can also read my review in today’s Nottingham Post and online

Nottingham Post

In the name of research I continued to drink my way around Nottingham and happened upon the Barley Twist on Canal Street, a Castle Rock establishment. The staff were very well informed and the beers clearly labelled

barley twist board

I opted for a light beer called ‘fallen odyssey’ and my drinking companion ordered another vegan beer the session IPA.

barley twist beer

Both were delicious and easy to drink. Another good Castle Rock pub that deserves a special mention is the Horse and Plough at Bingham, they always have at least one vegan beer on draft and unlike most of the other pubs serves great vegan food, it even has a separate vegan menu and again the staff are knowledgeable and helpful

 

Good food brings me on to The Angel on Stoney Street in Hockley. Not only are all its beers vegan and brewed on the premises, but their vegan food is also well worth a visit. I’ve tried their amazing jackfruit pulled burger and ‘steak’ and squash pie, with the best chips ever. Their beers are pretty good too ranging from a light easy to drink session beer to dark stouts and everything inbetween.

 

The last place on my mini vegan beer tour was Brewdog on Broad Street. It specialises in craft beers that tend to be a bit stronger, but their Punk IPA (on draft) at 5.6% ABV wasn’t too bad as long as I stuck to just a half. They also do a fair amount of vegan food to soak up the alcohol

 

I’ll just squeeze in three more Castle Rock pubs (visited by another volunteer, Kate) that deserve a mention; the Yarn bar, in the Theatre Royal, the Fox and Grapes in Sneinton market and the Beer Headz, in the old ticket office at the station. Staff at both pubs were very well informed and enthusiastic about their beers, but unfortunately the beers were not labelled as vegan

 

Fox and Grapes

Fox and Grapes

Beer Headz

Beer Headz

I am really excited by the prospect of more pubs embracing vegan beers, my waistline on the other hand might not be as excited!

Calorie cuts

Calorie cuts

Food makers told to cut calories by 20% by 2024

These were the headlines last week

Public Health England says the target would slash costs to the NHS by £4.5bn and prevent more than 35,000 premature deaths

obesity

Overweight children are consuming between 300-500 calories a day extra, This could equate to a weight gain of 1lb or ½ kilo per week.  But it’s not just children that are facing this issue more than 60% of adults are also too heavy

PHE’s new strategy outlines 13 food categories, including sandwiches, ready meals, savoury biscuits, cooking sauces and potato products such as crisps and chips.

Food producers could make a number of changes, including reformulating products, promoting healthy options and reducing portion sizes.

But as with many of these issues it is not just up to one organisation to make changes, we all have a role to play in stemming this obesity epidemic.  Parents and families can be positive role models, local councils could look at how many fast food outlets are sited near schools, Schools themselves can be proactive in promoting healthy eating, setting up allotments, offering safe ‘walk to school’ schemes, and children have a role to play by making positive choices

I can also help by offering support and advice about how to make healthier changes

Last week I talked to Gem106 radio, here’s two very short snippets of their news items

How to cut up to 500 calories from a child’s diet

Get them more active – burns calories

Eating more veg – its filling and has fewer calories and makes the plate look full. If they don’t like veg use a blender to blitz veggies into a sauce, curry, chilli, shepherds pie or lasagna

lasagne7

Use skimmed milk, plain low fat yoghurt (and add fresh or tinned fruit, in juice not syrup)

Don’t necessarily go for diet products as they can be high in sugar

Limit the amount of snacks and fast food a child eats – PHE records no more than two 100 calorie snacks a day

hummus veggie sticks Always have chopped fruit or veggie sticks in the fridge for children to snack on

Apps to help: change for life: sugar smart, food scanner

 

Children aged 4-10 are getting over 50% of their sugar intake from sweet treats

Each year children consume, on average, 400 biscuits, 120 cakes, buns and pastries, 100 portions of sweets, 70 chocolate bars and ice creams and 150 juice drink pouches and cans of fizzy drink

  • An ice cream – about 175 calories
  • A pack of crisps – 190 calories
  • A chocolate bar – 200 calories
  • A pastry – 270 calories

As well as calories that’s an awful lot of sugar.  Children should eat no more than 5-6 teaspoons of added sugar (also known as ‘free’ sugar) a day.  Yet the average daily consumption is more like three times that amount.

 

100 calorie snacks – max 2 a day

Individual packets (25g) of baked crisps

1 slice of malt loaf no butter

1 crumpet with small amount of butter, jam or marmite

fresh or tinned fruit salad (in juice)

chopped veg and hummus

rice cake

sugar free jelly

an oatmal biscuit

1 apple and 1 tbls wholenut peanut butter

a boiled egg

Supplements – do you need them

Supplements

Walk into any health food shop, supermarket or pharmacy and the shelves will be bursting with bottles and boxes that contain tablets, capsules and liquid drops that will (according to the blurb) have you feeling better, fitter and healthier.

supplements

But the big question is do we need to take these vitamin supplements or is there another alternative? 

There are certain vitamins, minerals and other nutrients that are essential for keeping the body functioning and healthy, including 13 vitamins – A, C, D, E, K and the eight B vitamins. The body only needs them in minute amounts. Most of us can get enough of these by eating a healthy balanced diet and, in the case of vitamin D, from getting enough sunlight. However, certain vitamin supplements may be beneficial to some groups of people, such as the elderly, pregnant women and children between six months and five years old. Or if you have a restricted diet i.e. being vegan

healthy eating

To decide whether or not you need to take supplements I would always recommend you visit your GP and have some blood tests.

If you don’t want to do that or your GP is unwilling to do some tests, there are lots of companies out there who will, but unfortunately they have to charge.  One such company is Medichecks https://www.medichecks.com a UK based organisation that I have personally met and spoken to.  If you have any questions they are only too happy to help and their staff are all medically trained doctors or nurses.  There is an added bonus of a 20% discount if you use this code

medichecks

Once you have your results you can then book a nutrition session (or series of sessions) with me and I can help support you to make any necessary changes

 

Your lifestyle can affect your nutrient uptake

Stress – produces cortisol, which can affect your metabolism and loss of essential nutrients like magnesium (needed for sleep and stress relief), calcium (bones, heart rhythm)

Obesity – often as a result of poor portion control or a less varied/more processed diet that lacks nutrients – sugary foods hinder the uptake of magnesium

Tiredness and poor sleep – not allowing time for the body to repair and renew

Processed foods, ready meals and takeaways – These foods can be high in fat, salt, sugar and calories.  And may lead to digestive issues, increased weight, reduced fibre intake and lack of nutrients

Lack of activity – can lead to weaker bones and a potential surplus of calories

Smoking – destroys lots of beneficial gut bacteria

Alcohol – can affect the gut bacteria

last week I spoke to Mark Dennison on his BBC Nottingham breakfast show about whether we should or should not supplement our diets

 

Each nutrient has a specific role to play:

 

Vital nutrient What it does High in
Vitamin A Needed for good for eyesight and healthy skin Yellow, red & green (leafy) veg, sweet potatoes, red peppers, yellow fruit (mango, apricots, Sharon fruit) dairy, eggs, oily fish, liver
Vitamin B group Helps the body to breakdown release energy from food, maintain a healthy nervous system, make healthy red blood cells Peas, tomatoes, broccoli, spinach, potatoes, soya beans, chickpeas, peanuts, fresh and dried fruit, rice, oats, wholegrains, fortified breakfast cereal, eggs, liver, milk, fish, cheese
Vitamin C Helps to keep cells healthy Oranges, berries, kiwi, broccoli, potatoes
Vitamin D Helps to regulate calcium and is essential for strong bones and teeth, The sunshine, mushrooms, oily fish, egg yolks, fortified foods, red meat, liver
Vitamin E Needed to maintain cell structure. Plant oils (olive, soya, rapeseed), nuts and seeds, wheatgerm, avocados
Vitamin K Needed for blood clotting to help wound heal Green leafy vegetables, vegetable oils, cereal grains
Zinc Helps make new cells, breakdown food and wound healing Wheatgerm, cereal, bread, dairy, meat and shellfish
Turmeric (active ingredient circumin) Linked to reducing cancer, Alzheimer’s, diabetes, arthritis (TOO EARLY TO SAY) Take with black pepper. Check with GP about existing medications
Pro and prebiotic Prebiotics feed the good bacteria that live in the gutProbiotics are live bacteria and yeasts that are good for your health Prebiotics – onions, garlic, leeks, Jerusalem artichokes, green leafy veg, over the counter yoghurt drinksProbiotics – live yoghurt (dairy and non dairy), kefir (fermented dairy and non dairy), kombucha (fermented black and green tea), tempeh (fermented soya beans), kimchi (fermented vegetables and spice) sauerkraut (fermented cabbage). Miso (soya bean paste), Pickles, soft cheeses, sourdough bread

 

With a few exceptions (niacin and vitamin D), our bodies cannot make these substances, meaning we need to obtain them from other sources such as food. If you have low levels of certain vitamins, you may develop 
a deficiency disease. Too little vitamin D, for example, could lead to rickets in children, not enough Iron could lead to anaemia.

It’s also worth bearing in mind that vitamin C and B vitamins are water-soluble and are used rapidly by the body; any excess is excreted out when you go to the loo. So you could be literally flushing money down the drain

Whereas fat soluble vitamins are stored in the body,  when taken in excess they could damage cells and organs particularly vitamin A and the liver

 

Zinc There is evidence that taking zinc within a day of developing symptoms
 of a cold reduces the duration of the 
cold by about a day and that regular supplementation (for at least five months) protects people against catching colds.

fruit-and-vegYou will have realised that fruits, vegetables, pulses and wholegrains are littered throughout the above table, so my advice to you is make sure these nutritious and delicious foods are regularly and consistently incorporated in to your diet.

But if you do have concerns about your health then please visit your GP, and then come and see me and I will help support you to make any changes.

Attending my vegan cooking class might be a good place to start

vegan classes gen

 

And breathe…

And breathe….

A simple breathing exercise could be your answer to weight loss. check out this months edition of Nottinghamshire Aspect and read my full article

notts aspect

 

 

notts aspect Feb

 

If you can’t get hold of it then read on…….

We are now a quarter of the way through 2018 and maybe you might still be keeping to your new years resolution to lose weight, with the hope that this time it’s going to be different!  But maybe you have already cheated on your diet and will have to start again; tomorrow or the next day or the next……

NY resolution

Every time you make these promises to yourself and you don’t keep them it can add to your stress and stress is the one thing that will derail all your good intentions.  Being stressed can trigger the release of a stress hormone called cortisol, which can often result in an increased appetite and potential emotional eating.

So my one secret to continued weight loss is to de-stress by deep breathing!

breathe

Practiced daily this quick and simple breathing technique can change your life for the better.  It will increase your energy levels and help you to achieve more.  By being in a relaxed state of mind you will be able to focus more easily, free yourself from stress, negative emotion and feelings of anxiousness.

trees

 

 

In other words ‘see the wood for the trees’

 

 

 

 

Lets get started!

  • Make yourself comfortable and close your eyes
  • Place one hand on your upper chest and one on your abdomen just below your navel
  • Slowly breath in through your nose as you count to 5
  • Hold for a count of 2
  • Slowly breathe out through your mouth as you count to 10
  • As you take your first breath in silently say to yourself ‘relax’.
  • As you breath out silently say to yourself ‘calm’
  • Repeat 4 times

Try to make sure the hand on your tummy is the only hand moving

 

When you are stressed or anxious you take shallow breaths using the top of your chest only.  Learning to breath more slowly and deeply can help keep you calm

After 4 deep breaths, shrug your shoulders up to your ears then quickly release them.  Repeat this 4 times.  Again this helps to release tension

Slowly open your eyes and notice how relaxed you are.  Now you are in a better place to focus on your healthy eating goals, make changes and see improvements

I can also help support you to make those small but permanent changes.  As an experienced nutrition coach I can keep you on the path to a healthier lifestyle.  I also offer cooking sessions for those that want practical tips and advice.  My business is based in West Bridgford but I also offer a telephone or Skype service for busy clients who can’t travel to see me

what i do

Foods to boost your immune system

Foods to boost your immune system

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

IMG_3188

 

Working at Maggie’s cancer supper centre in Nottingham, I’m often asked about what foods can help build up our immune system.  This is especially important to cancer patients who may have undergone some quite radical surgery, chemo or radiotherapy.  All of which can have a debilitating effect on the body

 

 

 

winter landscape

 

A strong immune system is also important to many us, as the winter bugs and viruses try to strike us down.

 

 

To strengthen your immune system it is important to

  • Load up on the foods that pack the biggest nutritional punch such as vegetables, pulses, nuts and wholegrain
  • Whilst avoiding processed foods (often high in fat and salt) and
  • Reduce the amount of sugar and alcohol in your diet.
  • You can do even more by selecting foods that are loaded with specific immune boosting nutrients.

Top tips for a healthy immune system

  • chopped veggies

    A rainbow of colour

    Eat a ‘rainbow’ of colour to get more antioxidants in your diet.  By that I mean have plenty of variety,  all the following foods help to nourish the thymus gland, which is responsible for much of the immune-system function.  Eat at least two servings a day of these foods rich in vitamins B, C and E, plus beta-carotene (vitamin A) and zinc – red peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, oranges, apples, tomatoes, kiwi, carrots, berries, red grapes, kale, onions, spinach, sweet potatoes.  You get the idea!

Ryvita hummus

 

  • Cook frequently with garlic because it’s a proven immune booster and has antiviral and antibacterial properties. The allicin helps to prevent and fight colds. So add it to hummus, pasta and curry dishes. Rub on to toasted sour dough for a low cal garlic bread

 

 

 

  •  spinachSpinach is rich in folic acid. It can be made into spinach pasta, added to soups, smoothies or pasta sauces.  It can brighten up a curry or bulk out a salad

 

 

  • Cinnamon is antiviral, anti fungal and antibacterial; sprinkle it on your porridge or muesli. Add it to low sugar bakes and biscuits or smoothies
  • Mushrooms – contain vitamin D (and will absorb more if placed on a sunny shelf), which is good at combating viruses. Add to stir-fries, soups and pasta dishes

IMG_3501

 

  • Stay hydrated  – try and drink at least 6 glasses of water, fruit teas, green and black teas etc a day

 

 

  • Tactivity exercise walkingake some regular exercise: If you want to boost your immune system, get active. Just increasing your heart rate for only 20 minutes three times a week is associated with an increased immune function, and a brisk walk five days a week can help reduce your risk of catching a cold.  Also being out and socialising can help boost your immune system

 

  • Have a giggle! –  Laughing decreases the levels of stress hormones in the body while increasing a type of white blood cells that fights infection.

healthy eating

Is it healthy for children to be vegan?

Is it healthy for children to be vegan?

Veganuary has come to an end, but for many who took the pledge to be vegan for January they have decided to carry on and remain vegan.  And often that decision is applied to the whole family, including the children

Vegan children 

This week the BBC programme ‘Food – truth or scare’  looked at the stories behind the confusing headlines about veganism and children

vegan children

 

 

and focused on the ‘Driver’ family with two young children.

 

 

I want to separate fact from fiction and help you to make an informed choice about your families health

 

Some issues to consider

Variety – the TV family had a good diet but tended to rely on the same foods for their protein, fibre etc.

So aim for as much variety as possible, using a mix of ready prepared dishes like burgers and sausages and homemade meals like soup, lasagne and other pasta dishes.  And of course serve plenty of vitamin packed vegetables and salads

vegan protein

If you need some inspiration have a look at my recipe page  http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/blog/category/recipes/

Calories

Children aged between 2 and 13 years need between 1000 and 2000 calories a day, depending on their age, gender and activity levels.  Therefore its important to get as much energy in every meal as possible.  Fat is the most calorific at 9 calories a gram with protein and carbs coming in joint second with 4 calories per gram

This is a concern for the ‘Driver’ family showcased on ‘Food – truth or scare’

Its therefore important to make sure children generally do not have reduced fat products i.e. yoghurt, milk, cheese etc.  There are vegan and plant based versions of all these products that often have the addition of extra vitamins and minerals

top-affiliate-marketing-tip-for-beginners

When making vegan mashed potato or mac and cheese for instance, add plenty of ‘marg’, milk, nutritional yeast and cheese.  Not only will this increase the calorie content, without increasing the portion size but it will add calcium, vitamin D and some B vitamins

 

 

These headlines make for scary reading, but malnourishment can occur with any diet.  It is therefore essential that your child eats ‘a rainbow of colour’.  By that I mean lots of different fruits and vegetables in order to obtain the maximum type of vitamins, minerals and fibre.

Vitamin C

top-affiliate-marketing-tip-for-beginners

A hand blender can come in very handy.  It allows you to hide lots of vegetables in a pasta sauce for instance.

A blender can also be used to make delicious fruit rich smoothies

 

Make your children’s food exciting 

packed lunch

This is a photo from a vegan parent, who makes packed lunches for her vegan children.  It has fibre filling wholemeal bread filled with vegan cheese and pickle.  Crackers and hummus  – great source of protein and calcium.  And plenty of colourful fresh fruit

 

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This is another lunchbox made by a vegan mum for her vegan 5 yr old’s lunch today; homemade pancakes with low sugar fruit spread, Violife original plus fruit and veggies

How tasty do they look!

 

top-affiliate-marketing-tip-for-beginners

 

When making smoothies add peanut butter or avocado to increase the fat and protein content

 

 

Planning ahead

Try and draw up a weekly meal plan, like this one from the Veganuary campaign.  This will help with shopping and cooking.  It will also make sure there is plenty of variety

 https://veganuary.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Family-Friendly-Meal-Plan-1.pdf

top-affiliate-marketing-tip-for-beginners

 

Tinned beans (chickpeas, cannellini, butter beans etc) can be blended in to a pasta sauce to increase the protein and calorie content.  Hummus (chickpeas) is also great on sandwiches, jacket potatoes and crackers

 

 

In this short video I explain some of the nutrients that need to be included into your families daily diet

Foods rich in these nutrients include Brazil nuts (and nuts in general), seaweed, kale, avocado, flaxseeds (linseeds), sesame seeds, tofu, Marmite and certain fortified products like cereals, bread, plant based milks, pasta sauces and orange juice

Good News!

The good news is vegan diets are generally higher in fruits and vegetables and wholegrains. This has the potential to reduce the families risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity and some forms of cancer

top-affiliate-marketing-tip-for-beginners

Smoothies are another great way to get children to eat a range of foods.  They can also help you to make them.

 

This short video shows another vegan mother sharing her favourite smoothie recipe.  But the combinations are endless.

 

Nottm Post Winter

 

I am a vegan nutrition coach and chef, so If you need additional help and support to keep your vegan family healthy, then consider a nutrition session or vegan cooking class with me

 

07946 301338  Susan@nutrition-coach.co.uk