Superfoods

Superfoods  – myth or magic?

Are you buying the superfood hype; either literally or figuratively?  These foods have been in the press for the last few years but recently new magic morsels have been added including lentils, quinoa, chills and green tea.

Its worth remembering there is no official definition of a “superfood” and the EU has banned health claims on packaging unless supported by scientific evidence.

So do certain foods deserve that badge of honour?

What makes a food ‘Super'; they often contain higher than average amounts of antioxidants or compounds that can keep the body healthy and potentially help fight some diseases.  In that respect foods like blueberries, broccoli, oily fish, beetroot juice, dark chocolate and to a lesser extent red wine all deserve praise as they have high levels of compounds like polyphenols and flavonoids

homemade chocolate bar

But so do blackberries, carrots, apples, oats, nuts, red cabbage, raspberries, flaxseeds, and most fruits and vegetables.  And importantly they are often cheaper than their ‘superfood’ cousins

The superfood debate got the attention of BBC radio Leicester, so I joined them for a discussion along with Sangita the owner of a local Leicester deli.

Click here to listen to the interview (15 minutes)

https://soundcloud.com/user-95908886/radio-leics-superfood

 

fruit-and-vegTo eat a ‘superfood’ rich diet we agreed that it should contain more fruit and veg than we currently eat.  Incidentally, did you know that only about 30% of the UK adult population get their 5-a-day.

cakesTry and reduce your level of processed foods; anything from ready meals, cured meats to pastries and cakes

Go for variety and moderation; the occasional treat is fine

 

Drink within safe alcohol limits (max 14 units a week) a small glass (125ml) of red wine can be beneficial

Stay hydrated with the original ‘superfood'; Water

In other words adopt a more Mediterranean diet that includes plenty of wholegrain, pulses, vegetables, fruit and olive oil and you will feel “SUPER

 

 

 

Vitamin D – should we take supplements?

Vitamin D – should we take supplements?

Its been widely reported in the press that we are recommended to take vitamin D supplements, after studies showed this “sunshine’ vitamin could protect against colds and flu.

Vitamin D

So before you go rushing off to your nearest health food shop I would suggest you first of all have your vitamin D level checked by your GP

Some of the common symptoms of Vitamin D deficiency are:

A true deficiency can only be confirmed by a blood test. But according to the NHS website, symptoms that may show you need a blood test are:

  • Aching bones
  • Having a low mood – vitamin D appears to have an effect on serotonin levels (feel good hormone
  • Being over 50 – the body makes less vitamin D as we age
  • Being overweight or obese – the higher your levels of body fat the more vitamin D is diluted (as it’s a fat soluble vitamin)
  • Having darker skin – it absorbs less of the suns rays
  • Gut troubles – coeliacs, Crohns or IBS can all affect the way the body absorbs fat soluble vitamins
  • People who cover up for cultural or religious reasons
  • Those who spend a lot of time indoors – the elderly and infirm for instance

How important is Vitamin D – What does it do?

The main job of vitamin D is to keep the right amount of calcium and phosphorus in our blood? These 2 nutrients work together to make our bones strong, so they don’t become brittle and break easily. If we don’t have vitamin D in our bodies, only a small amount of the calcium from our diet can be absorbed and only a little more than half of phosphorus is absorbed.

Vitamin D may also be linked to muscle strength, but this link is very recent and more trials and evidence needs to be gathered

Why is Vitamin deficiency so common in the UK?  We don’t absorb enough of the sun rays (overuse of sunblock) and spend a lot of time indoors 

A 2007 survey estimated that around 50% of all adults have some degree of vitamin D deficiency.  The rates of rickets is children has risen fourfold in the last 15 years

Gem news

 

 

Gem 106 radio contacted me this week for my opinion about vitamin D supplements.  Here’s an extract of that interview

 

 

 

Vitamin D supplements, should we take them? 1 minute 30

 

How can we increase our intake of vitamin D?

sunshineFirst and foremost expose your skin to 10-20 minutes of sun a day. – 90% of our vitamin D comes from this source. This has to be without sunscreen, so don’t do this when the sun is at its strongest and be sensible.

Certain foods are also high in vitamin D, including oily fish (such as salmon and sardines), eggs, milk/non dairy milk, orange juice. In the UK, infant formula and fat spreads are fortified with vitamin D. It is also added to other foods such as breakfast cereals, non dairy milks.

If your GP has confirmed you have below average levels of vitamin D, then some simple changes to your diet could be sufficient.  Why not contact me and book a free short consultation and we can get you back on track

07946 301338

Here’s another extract of the GEM106 radio interview, where we discuss food- its only 19 seconds long

 

How soon would we see the benefit?

It can take up to 3 months, depending on how low your levels were

 

Can you have too much?

Yes,  according to the NHS website there is a vitamin D toxicity, which may cause high levels of calcium in the blood and can lead to kidney stones. It can affect some pople.ie Vitamin D supplements plus lots of sun and lots of fortified food, but it is rare.

symptoms (of hypercalcaemia) include loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, headaches, weakness or drowsiness

Always check with GP/pharmacist if you want to take supplements as some medical conditions can make you more sensitive to Vitamin D (liver/kidney disease)

 

 

 

Healthy eating

Healthy eating – what do you want to know?!

 

NY resolutionsNew Year is usually about new resolutions, getting fitter, healthier and more focused. So I decided to ask my clients and social media followers what healthy eating questions they had for me so they could get on track and stay there.

 

Here’s a selection

What generally constitutes a healthy balanced diet?

I tell my clients and cookery class guests that its all about variety i.e. eating a rainbow of colour, so lots of different coloured vegetables and fruits will small amounts of wholegrain pasta, bread and rice. Moderation is also key and by that I mean portion control.

healthy eating

A good guide is to use your hand; protein should fit on the palm of your hand, potatoes (also rice, bread and pasta) should fit in to a cupped hand and veggies in both open hands. That brings me to balance; no one food should dominate your plate, meal or daily diet i.e. wheat or sugary foods/drink. We often hear about people cutting out food groups (wheat and dairy are the obvious ones) but I prefer substitution not elimination. That means having rye or oats instead of wheat and replacing cows milk and cheeses with non-dairy substitutes. And finally for a healthy diet it’s essential that you curb your caffeine, alcohol and sugar intakes.

 

Best vegan cookbook?

vegan cookbook

 

vegan cookbook2These two books come highly recommended: Eat vegan, Smith & Daughters by Shannon Martinez and Mo Wyse for a Spanish vibe to vegan recipes, and Super Foods Super Fast by Julie Montagu. Does what it says on the tin!

 

Any foods recommended that help combat dementia?

Firstly I’d start with a healthy balanced diet that’s low in sugar, salt, saturated fat and processed foods.

fruit-and-veg

More specifically include vegetables (especially dark skinned versions like aubergine, courgettes, spinach, kale and peppers), berries/fruits, nuts, green tea, olive oil, fish (especially oily fish like salmon, trout, mackerel) and unsaturated fats from milk products and spreads. Think Mediterranean diet.

 

How do I ensure my vegan teenager gets enough protein?

beansNuts and seeds, tofu, tinned beans (chickpeas, borlotti, cannellini, butterbeans etc), hummus, vegan cheese/dairy, edamame beans, peas, vegan quorn are all great protein sources

 

How does 5:2 fasting work?

When we eat a lot of carbohydrate (like bread, potatoes, rice and pasta) or foods high in sugar, it causes our blood glucose levels to rise. Our body produces the hormone insulin as a reaction to eating to keep our glucose levels stable.

Insulin also encourages fat cells to take up fatty acids and store them, the way it encourages liver cells to take up sugars and store them.

fastingStudies have shown intermittent fasting increases the effectiveness of insulin to store glucose and break down fats. This process will reduce your risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and cognitive decline

Another way fasting works is by reducing the amount of insulin-like growth hormone, which has been shown to reduce your risk of many age-related diseases, like cancer.  High levels of this hormone later in life appear to lead to accelerated ageing and cancer.

 

Is Agave a good alternative to sugar?

agaveIt has the highest fructose content of any commercial sweetener (90%). Fructose causes insulin resistance and significantly raises triglycerides (a risk factor for heart disease). It also increases fat around the middle, which in turn puts you at greater risk for diabetes and heart disease. It also has the same calories per gram as all other sweeteners (4 calories per gram). So like all sugars use agave with caution and moderation.

 

Could you suggest some healthy cooking oils for a vegan diet?

It depends on how high you are getting the oil, as some degrade and de-nature which will not only alter the taste but make it harmful. For high temperature cooking i.e. stir-fries or deep-fried I’d go for rapeseed or coconut oil. Sunflower oil should not be used for high heat cooking as it breaks down and forms aldehydes and lipid peroxides, which are harmful.

For general frying both coconut and rapeseed oils are also good and you can add olive oil to the list. But again not sunflower. But be aware that all oils contain the same calories per gram i.e. 9 cals. So whichever you choose try and use as little as possible and pat the food dry after frying. Also do not re-use the oil and keep the bottles out of direct light.

 

 

Let me know if you have some burning healthy eating question that you’d like some help with. Or maybe something’s caught your eye in the paper but you’re not sure about it?

 

Part time veggie

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

thai-tofu-curryOn Monday why not take part in ‘meat free Monday’ and become a part time veggie.   The idea is that one day a week you eat vegetarian or vegan meals. There are now an estimated two – three million vegetarians in the UK, who for a variety of wide-ranging reasons have given up meat and fish. You could become one of them

The number of vegans in the UK is also growing as the evidence that a plant based diet has health benefits increases

 

Why should you bite the bullet (or rather the carrot!)?

  • Weight – According to recent research by Cancer research UK vegetarians and vegans have a lower body weight.  Meat eaters who continue eating meat will carry on putting on more weight over a five year period, compared to those who switched over to vegetarianism.  The World Health Organisation believes being overweight can increase the risk of serious health consequences such as cardiovascular disease (mainly heart disease and stroke), type 2 diabetes, musculoskeletal disorders like osteoarthritis, and some cancers.  What is not widely known is that the risk of health problems starts when someone is only very slightly overweight, and that the likelihood of problems increases as someone becomes more and more overweight
  • imagesCholesterol – vegetarians  and vegans generally have lower cholesterol levels.  A recent study demonstrated that a vegetarian diet made up of specific plant foods can lower cholesterol as effectively as a drug treatment.
  • Longevity – many vegetarians and vegans will live longer due to their reduced risk of becoming obese, developing diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular diseases; in fact vegetarians have 32% less chance of having heart disease than their meat-eating friends.
  • Saturated fat – Red meat, especially processed meat, contains a lot of saturated fat (plus sodium, nitrites etc) that have been linked to increased risk of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer.
  • beansCost – as food prices rise its good to know that you can still buy good quality inexpensive protein like beans and pulses and turn them into delicious meals such as  veggie chilli or cauliflower chickpea curry.  Buying seasonal vegetables and fruit will also make your meals less expensive and more nutritious. More delicious veggie and vegan recipes can be found on my blog

Quick tips

  • Add a tin of beans to your soups, curries, chills and pasta dishes.  You’ll be adding low fat, low cholesterol protein
  • Make a frittata bursting with veggies like peppers, onions, courgettes and mushrooms.
  • soupHomemade soups are a great way to introduce a vegetarian meal.  Add lentils for additional protein.
  • Spiralise vegetables and have them instead of pasta
  • Nuts can be ground to make your own nut butters – packed with protein and good fats
  • Chickpeas make great hummus. Add to jacket potatoes, enrich a cauliflower curry or smear on to a piece of toasted sourdough

However the veggie garden isn’t completely rosy.  There is a higher risk of developing a B12 deficiency, which can lead to anemia.  Eating plenty of milk, cheese and eggs or certain fortified breakfast cereals, non dairy milks, nutritional yeast if you’re a vegan, should provide enough of this essential vitamin

coucousIf you’d like to increase your vegetarian repertoire then why not come along to my vegan and vegetarian cookery classes in West Bridgford? They occur most days from 11am (Tuesdays start at 12.15), I also run a session on a Tuesday evening at 5.30pm

Contact me for more details or to book a place 07946 301338

 

More detailed information about healthy eating can be obtained from my previous healthy diet blog

 

“Must haves” for a healthy balanced diet

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

Do you think you eat a balanced diet? Read on and see if you still feel the same way at the end!

thai-tofu-curryEating a nutritious, balanced diet will help you improve your overall health. In particular, a balanced diet can help:

  • Reduce your risk of heart disease and high blood pressure
  • Reduce your chances of getting cancer
  • You have more energy
  • Keep you well
  • You to lose weight
  • Improve your bowel health
  • Your skin, nails and hair look healthier

 

The two key elements to a healthy balanced diet are:

  • Eat the right amount of food for how active you are, and
  • Eat a variety of foods – this is where the ‘balance’ comes in

The “Must haves” for a healthy balanced diet should include:

  • fruit-and-veg-225x300Plenty of fruit and vegetables – at least 5 portions a day. Think ‘A rainbow of colour’
  • Fruit like grapefruit or melon eaten before a meal can help fill you up so you are less likely to overeat on higher calorie foods
  • Small amounts of bread, rice, potatoes, pasta and other starchy foods (choosing wholegrain varieties when possible)
  • Some milk and dairy foods (or diary alternative like soya).  Aim for 3 servings a day.
  • Sufficient meat, fish, eggs, beans and other non-dairy sources of protein i.e. Quorn, tofu and quinoa.  Aim to eat low fat protein at every main meal.
  • Just a small amount of foods high in fat, sugar and salt
  • Keep within the safe alcohol limits (14 units a week for men and women).  Its also advised to have alcohol free days
  • activity exercise walkingDrink plenty of water, about 6-8 glasses (or other fluids) every day: more if you exercise or if the weather is hot
  • Green tea contains two compounds; caffeine and catechises, that may boost your metabolism for a couple of hours.
  • Stay active – aim for 150 minutes of activity a week.  this can include classes at a gym, running, weight training.  But equally housework, gardening, walking and dancing can all count too

 

Some people make the mistake of thinking that because they are eating healthy food they can eat more of it.  This can lead to weight gain in the same way that eating unhealthy foods can, because all foods have calories!

Follow this portion guide and you won’t go far wrong

  • A healthy 75g serving of protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, beans, tofu) is the same size as the palm of your hand
  • A medium potato is the same size as your computer mouse
  •   A serving of dairy is:
    • 200ml of milk – regardless of full-fat, semi-skimmed or skimmed.
    • 30g hard cheese including cheddar, brie or stilton (around the same size as a matchbox)
    • 150g of plain or fruit yoghurt.
  • A medium piece of fruit is the same size as your fist
  • pasta-portionA serving of rice is half a teacup or 75g (uncooked)
  • A serving of pasta is 75g uncooked which weighs 170g when cooked al dente
  • A serving of vegetables is about 80g or about 2 tablespoons
  • A teaspoon of butter or margarine is the size of the tip of your thumb.
  • A unit of alcohol is half a pint of standard strength (3 to 5% ABV) beer, lager or cider, or a single pub measure of spirit. A 175 ml glass of wine is about 2 units and alcopops are about 1.5 units. A bottle of white wine has up to 9 units and 650 calories

Grilled vegetable frittata

Grilled vegetable frittata – serves one, 121 calories

IMG_2054This month it is IBS Awareness Month,  what better way to address some of the symptoms than by eating a healthy balanced diet, especially utilising the FODMAP diet (more on that later in the month!).  So start the day as you mean to go on and have a protein rich breakfast. Eggs are in fact a ‘complete’ source of protein because they contain all eight essential amino acids; the ones we cannot synthesise in our bodies and must obtain from our diet. And are naturally low in calories – the average egg has only 70 calories. Having them for breakfast could help with weight loss as the high protein content makes us feel fuller for longer.  They are also a great source of vitamin A and lutein – both needed to maintain eye health.  All of this makes them the ideal start to any day and great for vegetarians and meat eaters alike.

This great recipe is so versitile you can use up any left over vegetables and as well as being perfect for breakfast it can also be a quick and easy lunch as well as a satisfying supper.

So what are you waiting for, get cracking!

IMG_202420g sliced aubergine

40g sliced courgette

40g sliced pepper

1 spring onion

½ tsp olive oil

½ clove of sliced garlic

1 medium free range egg

splash of milk (dairy or non dairy)

large pinch of marjoram

large pinch of black pepper

small pinch of salt and chilli flakes

 

IMG_2028Switch on the grill place the sliced courgettes, aubergine and pepper on a heat proof tray and drizzle a small amount of oil over.  Cook under the grill for about 10 minutes, turning regularly to avoid them burning.  Remove and set aside.

 

In the meantime in an individual non-stick omelette pan heat the remaining oil and add the spring onion and garlic.  Cook for a few minutes until soft.

 

IMG_2026In a bowl crack the egg add a splash of milk, pepper, chilli and marjoram.  Whisk lightly.  Add the grilled veg to the omelette pan and pour in the egg mixture.  Move the egg mixture with a fork or spatula until it starts to set, this will take about 2-3 minutes.  Tip on to a plate and then back in to the omelette pan to cook the other side.  This will take a further minute or so.  Sprinkle the top with a pinch of salt. And slide out on to a plate

 

IMG_0593Serve with a large salad of leaves, tomatoes, cucumber, watercress, mint leaves and a drizzle of lemon juice or balsamic vinegar

A word (or two) about cholesterol

For many years eggs have been considered more of a health risk than a healthy benefit, due to their high cholesterol levels. But its now the case that the cholesterol content  is much lower than it was 10 years ago.  British research shows that a medium egg contains about 100mg of cholesterol, a third of the 300mg recommended daily limit. Also it is believed that saturated fat in the diet, not dietary cholesterol influences blood cholesterol levels the most.
If you are concerned about your cholesterol or are unsure whether it is safe for you to consume eggs please consult your GP.

Useful website: please visit this website for information about the safe handling of eggs  http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/Pages/eggs-nutrition.aspx

 

Healthy eating – Fact and fiction

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

In general all foods can form part of a healthy balanced diet as long as you practice portion control and don’t eat too much of any one group

Fruit and sugar

fruit-image-for-5-2-flyer1It is true fruits contain sugar, in the form of fructose.  But unlike pure sugar they also contains fibre, water, polyphenols, minerals and vitamins.   I would always advocate trying to eat most of your fruit whole, so you access all the nutrients, you also help your digestion by chewing the food and releasing digestive enzymes. And go for variety, red, green, yellow, orange or purple; they’re all good Homemade smoothies will count towards your five a day, but try not to peel the fruit and add some veggies for extra fibre and nutrients. A tablespoon of ordinary porridge oats will add soluble fibre; again this will slow down the rate at which the smoothie (and sugar) is absorbed keeping you fuller for longer and balancing out your blood sugar levels.

Steer clear of shop bought varieties unless it is an occasional treat as they often contain higher amounts of sugar and preservatives

Water

IMG_3503If you don’t get enough fluid you may feel tired, have poor concentration, get headaches and not perform at your best. Try and aim for 6-8 glasses of water a day. But other liquids can also count towards that tally – green tea, black coffee, milk (and non dairy milks), weak squashes, tea, coconut water, herbal teas etc. Water is still considered the best for hydration. It is also widely available, contains no calories and is free from your tap. For the record, alcohol does not count!

 

Couples eating habits

IMG_5377The latest research shows that middle aged couples who develop the same eating habits could increase their risk of becoming obese.  But the opposite may also be true; if one person eats healthily their partner may imitate those choices

 

 

Red wine

IMG_5006Contains some antioxidants that can offer some protection from heart disease. This protection is greater for men and post menopausal women. The benefit is lost if you consume more than 2 units a day, or one 175 ml glass

 

 

Carbohydrates from bread, rice, pasta and potatoes

WholegrainsA maximum of a 1/3rd of our diet should come from this group, and preferably wholegrain as they contain more vitamins and minerals and importantly more fibre; this helps us to keep fuller for longer by releasing energy slowly. Wholegrain carbs are also linked to a reduction in cholesterol and better digestive health.  A portion is generally 75g (uncooked weight)

What foods form part of your healthy eating regime?

 

Is your friend naturally skinny – Probably not!

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

Is your friend naturally skinny – Probably not!

You seem to eat the same but you put on weight and she doesn’t.  These 10 skinny secrets might explain why!

Enjoy breakfast – Your friend very rarely skips breakfast.  A study by the National IMG_3797Weight Control Registry (NWCR) confirmed that people who have lost weight were 80% more likely to keep it off if they ate breakfast.  Their daily calorie consumption was no more than people who didn’t eat breakfast.  Why not try scrambled eggs on wholemeal toast or my favourite eggy bread for a protein rich start to the day, or a bowl of porridge with a sliced banana and some blueberries on top to keep you full until lunchtime

Portion control – Have you considered how much you or your friend eat at each meal?  Simagesupermarkets, restaurants and café’s are going large!  For instance packets of crisps are now often sold as 50g grab bags rather than the smaller (and now rarer) 25g, restaurant plates and bowls are bigger so we are eating more when we eat out, and how often are you only offered a large latte when you order a coffee.  Upselling is a common practice in food outlets the classic being ‘do you want fries with that’!  Learn to say no and only eat what you need.

IMG_5039Alcohol – The same goes for alcohol; a standard glass of wine is at least 175ml or maybe even 250ml (or a ⅓ of a bottle).  If your friend orders a small glass of white wine and you have the largest and over the course of a night out you drink 4 glasses each.  She will have consumed 15 ½ units, over 1100 calories or the equivalent of nearly four burgers.  It would take just under 2 hours of running to burn off those calories alone

That compares to your four large glasses which is 28 ½ units, over 2000 calories or the equivalent of seven burgers.  It would take 3 hours 20 minutes to run off those calories

Take your time – We live in a fast paced environment; we text, email, instagram, fast forward commercials and we eat at a much quicker rate than we use imagesto and with lots of distractions.  How many times have you seen someone driving a car whilst eating a burger, or takeaway drink?  It is time to slow down and follow the wise words of our grandparents; chew your food slowly, put down you knife and fork in between mouthfuls and eat at the table.  Why is this so important?

It allows the ‘I’m full’ message to go from our stomach to our brain so that we stop when we’ve had enough and we don’t overeat.  Next time you go for a meal with your skinny friend notice how slowly she eats and match her pace

80/20 rule- This is about applying healthy eating principles 80% of the time and being imagesmore relaxed 20% of the time.  In reality that could mean whenever you go out for a meal 80% of the time you don’t have a pudding, but 20% of the time you do.  The theory behind it is that if you try for 100% all of the time you will fail but be a bit more realistic and you are more likely to stick at your healthy eating goals.  I bet your skinny friend doesn’t always have 3 courses when you eat out, or maybe they only have a small glass of wine with their meal.  It might be a good idea to follow their lead

 

imagesBe mindful – Does your skinny friend often refuse a biscuit because she is simply not hungry? This is called eating consciously; being aware of how hungry you are and stopping when you feel satisfied.

 

imagesEarly morning exercise – You and your friend might both have gym membership or enjoy an outdoor power walk but does she do most of her exercise in the morning?  If you exercise before breakfast you could burn 20% more fat.  Some people assume that if you exercise in the morning you will feel hungrier throughout the day and therefore your overall calorie intake goes up but this is not always the case.  Justine Jenkins, Director Vitalitybootcamps and a Health & Fitness Consultant (vitality bootcamps) said “I promote eating a smart breakfast -high protein then you can train at a high rate and not fatigue like you would if you have fasted whilst still benefiting from fat loss”.

Cook more - Cooking at home puts you back in the driving seat of calorie consumption.  Not only have you chosen the ingredients but you can also choose the portion size.  A homemade tomato based curry has far fewer calories than the creamyIMG_2807 korma you might have picked up from the takeaway.  The salmon sirfry that you created is far more nutritious than the sweet and sour version from the local Chinese restaurant.

Read food labels – The nutritional information on food labels will give you a clear picture of the calories, fats and sugars as well as the main ingredients.  It can help you to make an informed decision as to whether or not you buy it.  For instance if you bought a fish pie ready meal you’d like to see ‘fish’ as one of the top ingredient but you may not be quite so keen to eat it if the dish only contained 14% fish.

Buddy up – Eat out with your skinny friend and follow her lead.  She might order soup as a starter (often a lower calorie option and it fills you up), with her main she may skip the chips and ask for a salad with the dressing on the side.  And order a sorbet or fresh fruit salad for dessert, or miss it altogether if she is full.  Watch what she drinks too; does she avoid the sugary and calorie laden cocktails and instead orders a small glass of wine with a glass of water

Nottm Post WinterGet some advice – If all of this is just too much to take in then why not contact me for a FREE 20 minute consultation and I can take you through it step by step and also help you to make healthier food choices, so that you and your skinny friend will soon be able to swap clothes!

07946 301338,  @SH_nutrition, susan@nutrition-coach.co.uk

What have you got to lose?!