Cauliflower wings

Cauliflower wings

This  recipe is a slight variation on the Bosh recipe.  I’ve used gram flour instead of plain flour as I prefer the taste.  And if you use gluten free breadcrumbs as well it makes this recipe suitable for a gluten free diet

cauliflower wings

I’ve had a few people ask why a ‘meat’ associated word like ‘wings’ is used for a non meat recipe.  I think it gives people an idea about the texture, taste etc of a dish i.e. small pieces of spicy morsels.  Familiar words help those who are not fully vegan or are new to it understand what the dish might be like. Words like sausages, steaks etc will also encourage children to eat it. They may not if we said ‘cauliflower bites’ I’m sure new words will start to appear.

cauliflower wings

So maybe this recipe should be called ‘cauliflower crispy bites’, not so catchy though.  What do you think?

cauliflower wings

Serves 2 

Preparation: 20 minutes

Cooking: 40 minutes

Cauliflower wings

  • 1 small head cauliflower
  • 65g or ½ cup Gram/chickpea flour
  • 150ml or ½ cup unsweetened plant milk
  • ¼ tsp salt , ¼ tsp ground black pepper, ½ tsp garlic powder and smoked paprika
  • 100-150g or 1 cup bread crumbs – toast slightly before using or panic breadcrumbs (no toasting required)

Hot sauce

  • 80g or 1/2 cup hot sauce (such as Dunn’s river hot sauce, Franks buffalo sauce or sriracha and Gochujang )
  • 40g vegan butter,
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder/paste

Dipping sauce

  • 100g vegan plain yoghurt,
  • 1 tsp lemon juice,
  • Handful chopped chives, parsley, coriander or mint

Preheat oven to 180C, lightly oil a baking sheet

Using a knife, remove florets from the stalk.  Chop the florets and stalks into smaller bite sized pieces.

cauliflower wings

In a separate bowl, whisk the flour, plant milk, salt, ground black pepper, paprika and garlic powder/paste in a bowl to make a thick batter.

 

Pour the breadcrumbs in to a separate bowl and place it next to the batter bowl. Dip the cauliflower one at a time into the batter, shake off excess, then dip in to the breadcrumbs to coat completely and place onto the oiled baking sheet. Repeat until all of the wings are coated.

cauliflower wings

Bake for 20 minutes.

In the meantime, make the hot sauce: In a small pan over high heat, mix the vegan speed, garlic and hot sauce. Bring to a boil and boil for 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from heat. It should thicken slightly

cauliflower wings

Remove the wings from oven. Dip the wings in the spicy sauce . Return to the tray and bake for another 10-15 minutes for the sauce to soak into the wings.

cauliflower wings

 

Remove from oven and serve with the cool yoghurt sauce if desired.

I love serving this with a large mixed salad.  Alternatively serve on top of a spicy bean stew, or with some spicy Mexican rice (A packet of microwaveable Mexican rice is ideal), or as part of a vegan tapas meal

Soon my vegan cooking guests will be making their own cauliflower bites.  Let me know how you got on and if you made any changes

 

November is world vegan month

November is World vegan month

Does Nottingham cater for vegans?

world vegan day

Today, 1st November is World Vegan Day and the start of World Vegan month.  This year sees a huge rise in the number people adopting a vegan lifestyle or regularly including vegan meals in to their diet; New data revealed the number of vegans in the UK now exceeds three-and-a-half million, or 7% of the population. These figures indicate that veganism has seen a 700% growth in just two years (data from

https://www.livekindly.co/number-of-vegans-in-the-uk-surges-by-700-in-just-two-years/).  Maybe the fact that a  number of high profile celebrities like Beyonce, Lewis Hamilton, Ellie Golding, David Haye and Peter Egan to name but a few all follow a vegan diet.
world vegan month

world vegan month

Concern for animals and their welfare, taking better care of the earth’s resources and the environment or the health advantages of a plant-based diet are just some of the reasons for becoming vegan.

For some people it’s none of the above but they have allergies to dairy products or are lactose intolerant, hence the increased popularity and availability of non-dairy alternatives

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

But generally being a vegan is more of a lifestyle choice and a philosophy than a diet.

You can now buy ethical clothing, shoes, toiletries and makeup. But for ‘World vegan  ay and month’ I’d like to focus on the food aspect of being vegan.

logo-gem-106

 

Tune in to drive time from 4pm today on Gem 106 radio to hear snippets of my interview about World vegan day and its impact

 

 

In Nottingham over the last couple of years I have seen more vegan options in shops, supermarkets and eateries, an increase in wheat/gluten/dairy free cakes and goodies and special vegan events to raise awareness.

vegan food Nottingham

Did you know there is a vegan market in Sneinton on the first  and third Saturday of every month?

vegan market

 

I regularly write veggie food reviews for the Nottingham Post and the West Bridgford Wire, sometimes it’s a 100% vegan/vegetarian eatery like cafe Roya in Beeston or No 12 Hounds gate, in Nottingham https://www.no12houndsgate.co.uk in Nottingham

 

carrot salad

Or a regular restaurant that has a good selection of vegan options like la Storia, Chocks Away (at Nottingham City Airport),  Baresca, The Angel microbrewery, Pudding Pantry, Oscar and Rosies, Suda (Wollaton), Horse and Plough (Bingham), wagamama, Alchelmilla; the list just keeps on growing

vegan eateries

fav vegan restaurant?

 

 

courtesy of TeenVGN (Twitter)

courtesy of TeenVGN (Twitter)

Not to be outdone the main supermarkets have also increased their range of vegan options.  You can now buy vegan ready meals, Christmas selection boxes, non-dairy milk, yoghurt, ice-cream and cheese, pesto etc.  And the cheaper supermarkets like Aldi and Lidl also have some great choices too

In Nottingham we are also lucky to have a number of Asian and world food supermarkets and shops that have a plethora of vegan goodies like tofu, spices, noodles, lentils, nuts, Asian greens, sauerkraut, fresh herbs and pulses

 

 

For some the transition to being vegan is a staged process; they cut down on red meat and processed meat, then only eat fish, consider following the ‘Meat Free Monday’ campaign,  progress to becoming vegetarian then decide to take the plunge and go for a 100% plant-based diet.

vegan classes

If you are considering eating a more plant based diet but are concerned about nutrition then why not come to my vegan cookery classes.  More information can be obtained by following this link http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/blog/vegan-cooking-classes/ 

cookery feedbackYou can make sweet potato falafels, tofu rice rolls, beetroot risotto, lasagne, tacos and much much more. Contact me for more details 07946 301338

For more advice about adopting a vegan diet visit the vegan society website

How to maintain a vegan diet

How to maintain a vegan diet

If you’re new to the plant-based lifestyle or are worried about making the transition from a vegetarian to a vegan diet, Nutritionist Resource, the online resource for all things connected to health and well-being, have got some handy tips about How to maintain a vegan diet

nutritionist resourceThe full article can be viewed here https://www.nutritionist-resource.org.uk/blog/?p=7770

And I have provided the ‘handy tips’, which include how to veganise your favourite meals, planning ahead, don’t be hard on yourself, and how seeking professional support could ensure you maintain a healthy balanced lifestyle

vegan breakfast

vegan cooked breakfast in a cafe

 

If this sound like you and you are moving towards a more plant based diet then I can help with that transition

  • one, because I am a qualified nutrition coach
  • two, I am a vegan myself, and
  • three, I’m a trained chef and deliver vegan cooking classes

what I do 5

 

Mac and no cheese

Mac and no cheese – serves 2

This is a great meat free Monday recipe.  You can use any pasta shape and preferably wholemeal for added fibre.  And it makes two generous filling portions

IMG_6400

150g (1 cup) Macaroni

1 (200g) sweet potato (wash but don’t peel), ½ carrot, ½ onion- all chopped

2 cloves garlic

½ tsp turmeric and smoked paprika

large pinch salt , pepper and chilli flakes

300ml (1 ¼ cups) water

100g (¾ cup) soaked cashew nuts

10g  (¼ cup) nutritional yeast

3 tbls vegan spread or olive oil

1 tbls lemon juice

1 tsp Dijon mustard

 

ingredients

ingredients

Put the macaroni on to boil, cook as per packet instructions

chopped veg

chopped veg

 

Chop the veg place in saucepan, add water, garlic cloves, salt, turmeric, chilli, paprika, pepper and cook until soft (15 minutes.)

 

 

 

 

nutritional yeast

nutritional yeast

In a blender add the cashew nuts, lemon juice, vegan spread/oil/, mustard and nutritional yeast.  Add the cooked veg and the stock.  Blend. Do this in separate batches if you have a small blender and mix it all together in the pan.  If the sauce is too thick use some of the reserved cooked pasta water

IMG_6367

 

 

If the blender cup becomes difficult to open (due to the heat of the ingredients) wear a pair of clean washing up gloves to get a better grip

 

 

 

 

Drain the cooked pasta (keep the water), add it back to the pan and tip in the sauce

IMG_6363

Mix will.  If the mix is still too thick add some more of the reserved pasta water. Taste and adjust seasoning.

IMG_6369

Serve in a bowl topped half a sliced avocado and a large mixed salad

 

Optional additional step.  Before topping with avocado, mix a handful of breadcrumbs, ½ tsp garlic salt, 2 tsp olive oil, 5g nutritional yeast and 2 tsp mixed herbs together and scatter over the top of the dish.

Bake in a hot oven (170oC fan/190oC/gas 5) for 10 minutes until brown and crispy.

IMG_6374

 

Then serve with the avocado and a large salad

IMG_6399