Next vegan cookery class – 4th December

Next vegan cookery class – 4th December

In West Bridgford

My next vegan cookery class has a Christmas theme.

 

vegan cookery class - christmas

I have a few spaces left on my next vegan cookery class next Monday 4th December at 10am.

At my last class the guests made these colourful tofu rice paper rolls

 

If you can’t make Monday 4th.  I always have classes running on the following days and times Monday, Wednesday or Friday from 11 – 12.15pm, Tuesday from 12.15 – 1.30pm and Wednesday evening from 5.30 – 6.45pm

Come along and learn how to make chocolate truffles, cheats mince pies and ginger men biscuits

vegan cookery class - christmas1

It only costs £25 and all the ingredients, equipment and recipe sheet are provided.  You just need a container to take it home.  You can come for just one class or attend a series, in which case you can have 6 for the price of 5 i.e. £125, and they can be used within a year

cookery review

 

Feel free to take a peak around my kitchen!

 

If you’d like to come along please contact me on 07946 301338 to book your place.

Beetroot risotto

Beetroot risotto with pearl barley and quinoa

Serves 2, 320 calories per serving

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

IMG_4244This risotto has been inspired by Jack Monroe’s risotto recipe in the Royal Marsden cancer cookbook

 

 

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And is the perfect recipe for my Vegan cookery class to make this week!

The use of beetroot not only adds colour and a wonderful earthy taste but bags of fibre, antioxidants, potassium and iron. The pearl barley makes a healthy nutritional change to arborio rice: Its high in fibre, calcium and protein, but low in fat and calories. By adding quinoa the protein content really increases, making this a very filling and nutritious vegetarian and vegan dish

 

IMG_4276250g fresh beetroot, peeled and diced (or use the pre-cooked vacuum packs)

500 ml vegetable stock – either leftover stock from cooking some veggies or hot water and 1 teaspoon veg bouillon powder

2 tsp olive or rapeseed oil

1 fat garlic clove – crushed

1 small leek (80g) finely sliced

large pinch dried chilli flakes

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Pearl barley

100g pearl barley or buckwheat (which you need to pre soak overnight) and 25g of quinoa

50ml red or white wine (or water)

100g frozen peas (or broad beans)

2 tbls chopped mint and parsley

salt and ground black pepper

 

IMG_4296flavoured drizzle oil (optional)

zest and juice of half a lemon (equivalent to 2 tsp)

1 tsp olive or rapeseed oil

½ tsp horseradish

If you are not using the oil you can substitute the horseradish for the chilli flakes in the main risotto

 
horseradish

To make the drizzle vegan please use either fresh horseradish or a jar without cream

If you are using fresh beetroot put it in a pan and cover with some of the stock. Bring to the boil then simmer and cook for about 15 minutes until tender.

If you are using the vacuum packed variety, miss out this stage and simply open the packet*

 

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*A word of warning! which ever type of beetroot you use, be aware that it stains everything! So your chopping boards, spoons and hands will all be a lovely pink colour by the end of this. You can minimize the pink by wearing rubber gloves to handle the beetroot, cook with a metal spoon (never wooden for beetroot), or use a plastic chopping board

 

Meantime on a medium flame heat the oil in a large IMG_4281shallow pan and add the leeks and garlic. Cook for about 5 minutes until the leeks are soft.   Add the pearl barley and coat with in the oil. Then tip in the wine and allow it to bubble away for a few minutes.

 

Blitz the beetroot in a blender (a nutribullet does a great IMG_4287job), add the stock and chilli (or horseradish) and add a ladleful at a time to the grains. Keep adding a ladleful as soon as it is absorbed. This should take about 30-40 minutes

 

After 15 minutes add the quinoa (this takes less time to cook) and mix in. once the pearl barley and quinoa are soft and fluffy stir in the peas and 1 tablespoon of the chopped herbs. Taste and season with salt and lots of pepper

 

Serve into 2 warmed bowls

 

Lemon horseradish oil

Mix all the ingredients together and drizzle over the risotto

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Finally scatter over the remaining tablespoon of chopped herbs

 

 

 

risotto

 

And here’s how the finish dish looks when its made by my vegan cookery guests

 

 

 

 

 

 

BCAMThis is a great recipe to support breast cancer awareness month.  So why not make a larger amount (its easy to double or triple the ingredients) and invite your friends over.  They can make a donation to your favourite cancer charity like Maggie’s (the cancer support centre inside the grounds of the Nottingham City hospital)

 

Should you go Vegan?

Should you go Vegan?

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

The subject of veganism is appearing more regularly in the media; Lewis Hamilton is the latest big name to follow in the footsteps of Serena and Venus Williams and adopt a vegan lifestyle.  Vegetarian and vegan inspired cafes, pubs, restaurants are springing up all around the country – we have a plethora of them here in Nottingham – number 12 hounds gateRobe roomPeacockhorse and plough, binghamOscar and Rosiesangel microbrewery,cafe royaCrocus cafe to name but a few.  And of course I offer vegan cookery lessons in West Bridgford for those who wish to dip their toe in to vegan waters or for anyone that wants to incorporate more veggies in to their diet

vegan cookery class

Being vegan means not consuming any animal products or by-products.  Obviously that means no meat, fish, dairy and eggs.  For some it also means no honey.  They will also not wear leather or fur.  For many it is also more than just food, it’s a lifestyle choice centred around animal welfare, ethical treatment of animals and people and the conservation of the planet

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This article has also appeared in the local online resource West Bridgford Wire

http://westbridgfordwire.com/susan-hart-asks-go-vegan-2/

 

 

 

Here’s just some of the vegan food on offer in our Nottingham eateries

 

5 reason why veganism is worth considering

1. Vegans and vegetarians generally have a lower BMI (Body Mass Index),  which can lead to a reduced risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some cancers.

IMG_66442. Eating a more plant based diet means more antioxidants and phytochemicals which help fight free radicals and reduce inflammation; high levels of both could lead to an increase in chronic diseases like arthritis, heart disease and some cancers

3. Getting your 5-a-day.  Nearly two thirds of adults don’t manage to eat their recommended 5 fruits and/or vegetables a day.  These multicoloured powerhouses give us fibre, vitamins and minerals and help to stabilise our blood sugar levels

 

4. Reduced food costs?  A tin of beans costing beans50p has up to 10g of protein.  Buying fruits and veg when in season makes them more affordable they also contain optimum nutrition.  Dried beans and lentils can be bought in bulk.  Frozen fruits and vegetables are nutritionally equal to fresh and are often more convenient. Many fruits and veg can be obtained free of charge from local allotments, friends and family or by growing your own.

5. And we can’t get away from animal welfare, global warming and sustaining the planet.

If you want to take the plunge but don’t know where to start then consider attending my vegan and vegetarian cookery classes that run weekly on most days (except Thursdays) and Tuesday evening

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NP media cookery courseThe Nottingham Post online also covered the opening of my cookery school Nottingham Post article

So come along and make something new and nutritious

Contact me on 07946 301338 or susan@nutrition-coach.co.uk

 

 

A vegan diet can be naturally lower in calcium, vitamin D, iron, vitamin B12, zinc and omega-3 fatty acids.  But with some careful meal planning vegans can incorporate these micronutrients into their diet.

Marmite and soya (B12), Mushrooms and sunshine (Vitamin D), Flaxseeds (Omega 3), Green leafy Veg and pulses (Iron), citrus/dried fruits and sesame seeds (calcium) and Tofu, nuts and seeds (*zinc)

vegan cookery testimonial J Pemberton 2

Vitamin D was in the media this week; with Public Health England suggesting that everyone should take a supplement in the winter months due to the reduced sunlight.   One of the best ways to obtain this crucial vitamin is to be in the sun for about 10-15 minutes a day without sunscreen. so take a break at lunchtime and go for a quick walk, spend some time in the garden, walk the dog or take the children to the park.  All those activities done without sunscreen for 10 minutes should help your body to make Vitamin D.  After all it’s called the sunshine vitamin! 

* Unrefined grains such as wholemeal bread, pasta and rice, are high in phytates, which can block zinc absorption

 

Eat together eat better

Eat together eat better

 

dinner tableAccording to the latest figures from Gem 106 families eat together as few as 7 times a month. Does that surprise you, are you one of those families, do you eat every main meal at the table, or do you prepare meals at different times of the day for your household?

 

Do you remember when you were young and meals were always noisy family affairs with squabbles, chatter and laughter around the table. Well just over third of us do that now and nearly a quarter of us sit in front of the TV to have our meals.

I was asked by Gem106 radio if I was surprised that just under half of people aren’t eating at the table each night. Here’s a 2 minute clip

 

There are many reasons why eating at the table can benefit the whole family.

It’s a great time to bond as a group; to talk over what each has done during the day, what’s troubling someone, to share happy stories and to seek reassurance and security.

 

IMG_4069Children can get involved in the planning, cooking and serving of meals (even if you eat different things) and appreciate the time and effort involved in that process. Fun dishes like pitta pizza’s, spiralised veggies, fruit kebabs and tomato spaghetti could encourage then to get involved. Home cooked simple meals are generally lower in sugar, fat and salt than ready meals and takeaways. And the parent can moderate the amount of food that is consumed so that healthy portions are served, including the children’s five-a-day.

Some studies have suggested that family meals may reduce the risk of childhood obesity and may help the whole family to develop healthier eating patterns. Parents can lead by example choosing healthier meals like grilled chicken with sweet potato wedges and vegetables, oily fish (sardines on toast or tuna pasta bake) or a vegetable and cheesed filled omlette with baked beans.

 

It has also been suggested that a child’s development in particular their vocabulary can be improved by listen to and taking part in family conversations.

 

spiraliseWhen eating in front of the TV or being distracted by other gadgets, the brain often fails to register when you’ve had enough to eat, until its too late and you’ve overeaten, feel bloated or sick.   Family meals can have the opposite effect; time is taken to eat, chewing and digesting can be done at a slower pace and the bodies “I’m full’ signals can be recognised. This can lead to a reduction in calories consumed.

Maybe what’s stopping families is a lack of cooking confidence or maybe someone in the family has special dietary requirements like gluten free, vegan or vegetarian. If that’s the case then maybe coming to my vegan and vegetarian cookery classes could give you the confidence and support you need

vegan cookery poster jpeg

This is a short 2 minute clip of Nicky, who came to one of my classes and what her experience was like

Has any of this made you think and appreciate that family meals can be so much more than just a chance to refuel?!

Simply veg

Cooking up a storm!

For more healthy eating advice please visit my website http://www.nutrition-coach.co.uk/

coucousI’m half way through my vegetarian and vegan cookery classes in my converted convent in West Bridgford. So far my guests have cooked quinoa salad, spicy chickpeas with spring cabbage and cauliflower couscous. What’s waiting for them in the coming weeks is chocolate chia pudding with dates, spicy Thai tofu curry and spiralised sweet potato with kale

 

couscous1It is not all about ‘simply veg'; my aim is to show how easy it is to cook healthy simple yet tasty vegan food, which can be enjoyed by the whole family, eaten by one person or adapted for meat and fish eaters. Interspersed within the cooking is nutritional advice and cooking tips, such as freezing leftover herbs in ice cube trays, how lemon juice can take the place of salt as a flavouring, the importance of fibre and ways to reduce sugar intake.

 

ingredients2There is growing evidence that a more plant-based diet has positive health benefits, ranging from a reduced risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity and some cancers to weight loss.

 

If you fancy trying something new, want to cook with others and learn some nutritional tips then contact me and we can get you booked in

 

Classes generally start at 11am on a Monday, Wednesday and Friday. On a Tuesday they start at 12.30pm and 5.30pm . Each class lasts an hour and 15 minutes and all the ingredients and equipment are provided. All this for just £25. But if you book 6 sessions in advance you only pay for 5

 

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There is no time limit on when you come for your 6 sessions, so feel free to take a break

phone  Call 07946 301338